Month: February 2016

NIU Literacy Event at NIU-Naperville Campus

Woman reading in libraryNorthern Illinois University’s Department of Literacy and Elementary Education (LEED) is sponsoring a Literacy Event: “Reading & Writing in the Digital Age” on Wednesday, March 23, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m at the NIU-Naperville campus, 1120 E Diehl Rd, Naperville, Ill. This event provides an opportunity for alumni to reconnect with current students, alumni and faculty. Alumni are encouraged to bring colleagues and introduce them to the NIU literacy community.   In addition, teachers interested in earning the M.S. Ed. in Literacy Education with a Focus on Reading (reading specialist endorsement) are invited to attend to learn more about joining the summer 2016 cohort in Naperville.

This networking event will include a brief program by faculty and alumni. Information will also be provided to prospective students regarding the new reading cohort that will begin at NIU-Naperville in the summer of 2016.

Light refreshments will be served and door prizes given away.   For reservations, please contact Gail Schumacher at gschumacher@niu.edu or 815-753-7948. Visit the department website at http://www.cedu.niu.edu/leed/index.shtml.



College of Education’s spring 2016 Community Learning Series panel to discuss concussion in youth sports

Sharon Moskowitz

Sharon Moskowitz

Sharon Moskowitz, a NIU graduate student and life-long athlete, suffered her first concussion at 15, the result of a particularly aggressive foul during a high school basketball game. Moskowitz’s opponent hit her so hard that it broke her nose and knocked her out for a few moments. Her coached benched Moskowitz for a month – not because of the concussion but because of the broken nose. At the time, athletes were expected to shake it off after having their bell rung.

Since then Moskowitz has suffered as many as eight concussions, most recently from a ski-boarding accident that left her stuttering for a month afterward.

“Awareness of traumatic brain injury was almost non-existent while I was growing up and in college,” she said.

But that awareness is growing.

Publicity surrounding brain damage among retired professional football players and research into the long-term effects of head injuries among young athletes have left parents wondering about their child’s safety on the field and prompted lawmakers nationwide to pass new laws regarding concussion in youth sports.

The NIU College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education will address these issues in a panel discussion titled “Concussion and Youth Sport” on Tuesday, March 22, 2016.

Paul Wright, Moderator

Paul Wright, Moderator

The panel will include medical doctors, policy makers, researchers and others associated with youth sports who will provide information about the effects that concussions have on young and developing brains, as well as details of the Youth Sports Concussion Safety Act which goes into effect at schools across Illinois this fall. Moskowitz will also be on hand to share her own experiences with concussion. (See below for a complete list of panelists.)

NIU Professor Paul M. Wright will moderate the panel. He oversees a multi-disciplinary group known as the Physical Activity Group and Life Skills Group. That group combines expertise from NIU’s programs in kinesiology, psychology, speech and language pathologists and public health. Together they work with organizations like the YMCA and youth sport leagues to promote positive youth development through sports, and to ensure that the wellbeing of athletes is always at the forefront.

“I think the most important thing the science has shown us is that concussions, even sub-concussive events like heading the ball in soccer, have more serious consequences for young athletes than we thought just 10 years ago,” he said. “That the practice for decades has been to tell the injured participant to shake it off and get back in the game has only compounded the problem.”

Matt Wilson

Matt Wilson

According to a 2013 report released by the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council the report examined concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Among the findings:

  • The reported number of individuals aged 19 and under treated in U.S. emergency departments for concussions and other non-fatal, sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries increased from 150,000 in 2001 to 250,000 in 2009.
  • Football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, and soccer are associated with the highest rates of reported concussions for U.S. male athletes at the high school and college levels.
  • Soccer, lacrosse, and basketball are associated with the highest rates of reported concussions for U.S. female athletes at the high school and college levels.  Women’s ice hockey at the collegiate level has the highest rate of reported concussions.
  • Youths with a history of prior concussion have higher rates of reported sports-related concussions.

“NIU is hosting the panel to bring together an array of experts in the field of youth sports and concussion to answer questions that parents, school administrators, nurses, coaches and others involved with youth sports have about concussions and the new law,” said Wright.

Event information

Concussion and Youth Sports Panel Discussion

Tuesday, March 22, 2016
Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center
231 N. Annie Glidden Rd.
Reception: 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Panel discussion: 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Light hors d’oeuvres will be served

Free and open to the public

For more information, please contact Dr. Paul M. Wright at (815) 753-9219 or pwright@niu.edu

 

Panelists:

Cynthia LaBella, M.D.
Medical Director
Institute for Sports Medicine
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

Jeff Mjannes, M.D.
Director
Chicago Sports Concussion Clinic
Rush University Medical Center

Matt Wilson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Division of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders
Northern Illinois University

Adam Potteiger, MS, ATC
Certified Athletic Trainer
Division of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

Thomas Kim
Principal, coach and former high school athletic director
Huntley Middle School

Sharon Moskowitz
Athlete, NIU graduate student

Moderator:
Paul. M. Wright, Ph.D.
Lane/Zimmerman Endowed Professor in Kinesiology and Physical Education
Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education
Northern Illinois University

 



Alumni Profile: Anwer Al-Zahrani

DeKalb winters can be difficult for anyone to get used to, but for Anwer Al-Zahrani, it was especially tough. In his home country, Saudi Arabia, temperatures rarely dip below freezing, even on the coldest of days.

Fortunately, Al-Zahrani arrived at NIU in 2010 by way of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he completed a master’s degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). His time in the Keystone State helped him acclimate to what he would experience at Northern.

Despite the weather, Al-Zahrani’s decision to pursue his doctorate in instructional technology at NIU was, in the end, an easy one to make.

“It took me about nine months to research doctoral programs both in the United States and in other countries. I was accepted into a number of programs, but the reputation of Northern and especially of the Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment [ETRA] was a strong factor for convincing me to come to DeKalb,” he said.

In addition to a master’s degree in TESOL, Al-Zahrani had previously earned a bachelor’s degree in English linguistics, literature and translation. By coming to NIU, he hoped to merge his knowledge of language learning with technology, ultimately to help his employer, the Royal Commission for Jubail and Yanbu, Jubail Colleges and Institutes Sector (RCJY JCIS), integrate technology into its teaching, learning and training programs.

Anwer is now an assistant professor at RCJY JCIS, which includes five institutions of higher learning – three in Jubail Industrial City, located on the Arabian Gulf, and two in Yanbu Industrial City, located on the Red Sea. He is also a member of JCIS’s E-Learning Project Committee, which seeks to expand the country’s online teaching capabilities.

During his years at NIU – he graduated in summer 2015 with a doctorate in instructional technology – Anwer earned a reputation for hard work and participation in department initiatives such as ETRA’s annual Learn-IT Conference. Along the way he received a number of honors, including the University’s Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award and its Outstanding Student Contribution to International Education Award. He also found time to co-found NIU’s Saudi Student Association and was a member of both the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars and the Golden Key International Honor Society.

“Anwer is one those rare leaders who is a model of reasoned discourse, compassion and purposeful action that improves the working relationship of his community,” said ETRA’s Wei-Chen Hung, who in addition to being department chair also sat on Al-Zahrani’s dissertation committee.

“He became fascinated with the problem of how technology may be used to support intercultural team learning and developed an impressive and deep understanding of the theory and necessary methodology to explore cross-cultural work. He is a nurturing facilitator among his fellow students, as well as a source of intelligent insights into the complications of cross-cultural team work.”

About 35 percent of ETRA’s students are international.

As a graduate teaching assistant, Al-Zahrani taught online courses for five years, an experience that he says helped crystalize his thoughts about how to share with his Saudi colleagues the knowledge and experiences he was gaining at NIU.

“Ever since joining the instructional technology program, I had envisioned future partnerships [between the CoE and JCIS] that would help foster learning and training processes in Saudi Arabia.”

During a visit last fall, in fact, Al-Zahrani and Hung discussed collaborative initiatives and identified several research and development opportunities that would be worth exploring. One immediate opportunity would be to have COE and RCJY CIS faculty collaborate on curriculum development for the RCJY CIS industry-training program. The goal is to promote technology-integrated yet cultural-relevant teaching pedagogies that can support students in acquiring occupational skills in a meaningful way.



CAHE encourages undergrads to go to grad school at NIU

A-Place-For-You-Final[1]The Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education (CAHE) has just launched a new program – “There’s a Place for You at NIU” – designed to encourage students from underrepresented groups to return to graduate school at NIU after earning their undergraduate degrees here.

Spearheaded by CAHE Chair Suzanne Degges-White, Professor LaVerne Gyant, and the department’s academic counselor, Danae Miesbauer, the program offers a $200 scholarship to eligible students who participate in seven workshops that will be held throughout the semester.

Twenty-six students attended the first “There’s a Place for You at NIU” event on Jan. 26, which included a Q&A session with a panel of graduate students, information about NIU graduate application deadlines, and test preparation options.

Future workshops will focus on topics such as mentoring, networking, applying to scholarships and tips on how to land graduate assistantships, according to Miesbauer.

Danae_Simonsen-WD-01_611x918

Danae Miesbauer

Miesbauer emphasized that although CAHE faculty and advisors developed the initiative, its primary goal is to increase the number of undergraduate students who are accepted into any NIU graduate program, not just those within the College of Education. “It is a university-wide effort,” she said.

CAHE is well positioned to lead the effort, having long been committed to serving a highly diverse student population. Currently one-third of master’s students in counseling and nearly half of doctoral students are from underrepresented groups, according to Miesbauer. Additionally, 47 percent of adult and higher education master’s students and 53 percent of doctoral students are from underrepresented populations.

Backing for the project came from the NIU Foundation, which last fall  invited the Colleges of Education, Health and Human Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences and certain administrative groups to submit proposals for competitive grants to support recruitment and retention efforts. “There’s a Place for You at NIU” was one of the five proposals to receive funding. “We deeply appreciate the support the Foundation has given our project,” Miesbauer said.

 



Study education, culture in Japan

JapanProfessors Stephen Tonks (College of Education), Helen Nagata (College of Visual and Performing Arts), and John Bentley (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) will direct a Japanese culture, history, art and education study abroad program from May 16-29, 2016.

The program, which will take place in Western Japan using Yamaguchi City as a base, is open to NIU students of any major who are interested in Japanese language, culture, history, art and/or education. Through guided tours and lectures, students will visit numerous cities and sites including schools, universities, ancient temples, museums, Hagi (an old castle town) and Yuda Natural Hot Springs.

Interested students should visit the NIU Study Abroad Office (SAO) website and search for “Japan” to apply online. The deadline for applications is Feb. 29, 2016. The application process requires a $200 fee/deposit. The NIU program cost of the trip is $3,580. For more details, contact the SAO office at (815) 753-0700 or niuabroad@niu.edu.