Month: April 2016

SHAPE America honors KNPE’s Paul Wright

Paul Wright

Paul Wright

(This story originally appeared in NIU Today.)

SHAPE America (Society of Health and Physical Educators) presented its Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award to NIU’s Paul M. Wright, who holds the Lane/Zimmerman Endowed Professorship in Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Wright was recognized April 7 during SHAPE America’s 131st National Convention & Expo in Minneapolis.

SHAPE America presents the Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award annually in recognition of one higher education faculty member for his or her efforts to mentor undergraduate and/or graduate students pursuing a degree in physical education, sport, kinesiology or exercise science.



Donor Tea Reception

Over 150 donors, students, faculty and staff gathered last Sunday afternoon at the Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center for our annual Donor Tea event.  The event is held to thank our donors and friends for their support of the College of Education over the years.  Donors have the opportunity to meet their scholarship recipients and mingle with campus colleagues, faculty and staff while enjoying light refreshments and tea.  During a short program, Dean Elish-Piper welcomed everyone to the event and introduced a thank you video which featured several of our scholarship recipients sharing the impact scholarships and other opportunities have had on their lives.  John Sentovich, Chief Advancement Officer at the NIU Foundation, addressed the group and discussed the importance of planned giving and how much donor gifts can impact students, as evident from the recipients in the audience.  He encouraged all students to pay it forward in the future when they are in the position to give back and assist others.  Students David Carson (graduate student LEPF) and Jael Monteagudo (undergraduate student LEED) shared their personal stories of the impact that scholarships have had on their lives.  Carson explained what a positive mental boost it was to him to know that others believed in him.  Monteagudo shared how driven she was to help students succeed and how the scholarships were helping her lessen her financial burden.



Pluim named acting chair of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations

Carolyn Pluim

Carolyn Pluim (formerly Vander Schee)

Carolyn Pluim has been named acting chair of the Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations (LEPF) in the College of Education effective July 1, 2016.

Pluim brings years of expertise and experience to the position. Her research interests are focused around the intersections of sociology of education, curriculum studies and educational policy, specifically as these relate to school health policies, practices and pedagogies. She explores the ways in which contemporary school health policies are negotiated and experienced by students and school personnel. A central theme running throughout her research is the relationship between discourse and social dynamics as this bears on sociological understandings of health, illness and the body and influences the responsibilities and obligations of public schools.

Pluim joined the NIU faculty in 2007. She is currently the Assistant Chair and an Associate Professor in LEPF. She currently serves as a member of Faculty Senate, University Council and is Chair of the General Education Committee.

“LEPF is a great department that consists of incredibly talented faculty and staff who are committed to students and their learning,” Pluim said. “I am happy to represent the department in this role.”



Concussion and Youth Sport Panel

Community Learning Series Spring 2016According to a 2013 report released by the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, the reported number of individuals aged 19 and under treated in U.S. emergency departments for concussions and other non-fatal, sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries increased from 150,000 in 2001 to 250,000 in 2009.

The report also revealed sports associated with the highest rates of reported concussions in U.S. athletes at the high school and college levels—linking football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, and soccer to male athletes and soccer, lacrosse, and basketball to female athletes. Women’s ice hockey at the collegiate level has the highest rate of reported concussions.

Publicity surrounding brain damage among retired professional football players and research into the long-term effects of head injuries among young athletes have left parents wondering about their child’s safety on the field and prompted lawmakers nationwide to pass new laws regarding concussion in youth sports.

On March 22, the NIU College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education (KNPE) addressed these issues in a Community Learning Series event panel titled “Concussion and Youth Sport.”