Tag: Chad McEvoy

KNPE scholarships impact lives

Corina Salinas

Corina Salinas

Corina Salinas played sports in high school and college, including track and water polo.

“With any athlete, you’re always going to be in some sort of pain. It just depends on your perception of that pain,” says Salinas, a fifth-year senior from the South Side of Chicago. “That always intrigued me. Every human being has a different perception of pain, and a different level of pain. I wanted to learn more.”

Katherine Kendall had her eyes on a career in nursing. She took all the right courses at Illinois Valley College and worked as a CNA in a local nursing home and hospital, but soon discovered “something missing.”

“It didn’t fit me,” says Kendall, a senior from Mendota, Ill. “I shadowed everyone in the physical therapy department, and I instantly connected with the athletic trainers and the goals they set for their profession. I completely fell in love with athletic training from then on.”



KNPE finds global partnerships in Macedonia, Kosovo contacts

Musa Selimi, dean of faculty of Physical Education and Sport at Prishtina University in Kosovo, joins College of Education Dean Laurie Elish-Piper and Chad McEvoy, chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Musa Selimi, right, dean of faculty of Physical Education and Sport at Prishtina University in Kosovo, joins NIU College of Education Dean Laurie Elish-Piper and Chad McEvoy, chair of the NIU Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Chad McEvoy didn’t need time to think when he heard that the rector of the State University of Tetovo wanted to collaborate with NIU’s Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education.

“The rector has a sports background – he was a competitive wrestler and is still an avid athlete – so, when I got a call out of the blue a year or so ago asking if would have an interest, I said, ‘Yes, of course,’ ” said McEvoy, chair of the department in the NIU College of Education.

“KNPE does not have an extensive history or background in these types of international collaborations,” he added. “This allows us to become more visible globally and to participate in discussions about best practices, and teaching and scholarship in kinesiology fields, on a global platform.”



Concussion and Youth Sport Panel

Community Learning Series Spring 2016According to a 2013 report released by the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, the reported number of individuals aged 19 and under treated in U.S. emergency departments for concussions and other non-fatal, sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries increased from 150,000 in 2001 to 250,000 in 2009.

The report also revealed sports associated with the highest rates of reported concussions in U.S. athletes at the high school and college levels—linking football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, and soccer to male athletes and soccer, lacrosse, and basketball to female athletes. Women’s ice hockey at the collegiate level has the highest rate of reported concussions.

Publicity surrounding brain damage among retired professional football players and research into the long-term effects of head injuries among young athletes have left parents wondering about their child’s safety on the field and prompted lawmakers nationwide to pass new laws regarding concussion in youth sports.