Tag: Julie Hapeman

And the award goes to …

Congratulations to these members of the College of Education family!

Annie Malecki

Annie Malecki

Annie Malecki, a Physical Education major, was recognized as a SHAPE America Major of the Year with about 80 other students from Physical Education Teacher Education programs across the country.

She plans to teach physical education with an emphasis on wellness and whole body fitness. Her focus is on yoga, Pilates and dance.

During the SHAPE America national convention in Nashville, Malecki also was awarded the SHAPE America Ruth Abernathy Presidential Scholarship.

The honor is given to a SHAPE member with a GPA of 3.5 to 4.0, scholastic proficiency, good leadership skills, professional service and good character. She receives a scholarship of $1,250 and a three year membership to SHAPE.

Malecki, a senior, will student-teach this fall. She already is a certified Zumba instructor.

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Kristina L. Wilkerson

Kristina L. Wilkerson

Kristina L. Wilkerson, a doctoral student in the Counselor Education and Supervision program, has been named a Fellow of the National Board for Certified Counselors Minority Fellowship Program of the NBCC Foundation, an affiliate of the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC).

As an NBCC MFP Fellow, Wilkerson will receive funding and training to support her education and facilitate her service to underserved minority populations.

The fellowship also will assist her in becoming more involved in her research area through direct service, in receiving mentorship in her clinical and academic roles and in completing her doctorate degree. She is currently interested in researching the relationship between counselor education, supervision and multicultural counseling competency in novice counselors.

Wilerson is a Licensed Professional Counselor who provides individual and family counseling to diverse clientele. She also is an adjunct faculty member at National Louis University, where she provides counselor education in subjects such as counseling theory, counseling skills, psychological assessment and multicultural counseling.

She is also a graduate assistant in the NIU Office of the Ombudsperson, where one of her roles is to serve undergraduate and graduate students in developing skills to advocate for themselves when experiencing racial, gender or sexual orientation harassment or discrimination.

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Julie Hapeman

Julie Hapeman

Julie Hapeman, a graduate student in the Department of Special and Early Education’s Project VITALL master’s degree program, has received the 2018 Community Giving Award from the Wisconsin Council of the Blind & Visually Impaired.

The council’s annual awards celebrate individuals and organizations who have made significant contributions to promote the dignity and empowerment of people who are blind and visually impaired.

Hapeman was nominated by the council’s fund development committee for her dedication to community education and the empowerment of young people through the annual White Cane Day Celebration as well as her generous gifts to the White Cane Fund.

She also is a 1992 alumna of the NIU College of Education, holding a B.S.Ed. in Special Education with a Visual Impairments emphasis.

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The NIU Graduate School honored recipients of the Outstanding Graduate Student Awards and the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship during an April 24 reception.

Outstanding Graduate Student Awards

  • Michael Belbis – Kinesiology and Physical Education
  • Elbia Del Llano – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Emmanuel C. Esperanza Jr. – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Kendra Nenia – Special and Early Education
  • Addison Pond – Kinesiology and Physical Education
  • Brittany Torres – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Suzy Wise – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship

  • Brigitte Bingham – Educational Technology, Research and Assessment
  • Shatoya Black – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Naina Richards – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Stephen Samuels – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education
  • Konya Sledge – Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

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Jason Dietz, Sherri Lamerand and Kim Haas

Jason Dietz, Sherri Lamerand and Kim Haas

Jason Dietz, principal of Walter R. Sundling Junior High School in Palatine, was named the 2018 Illinois PTA Outstanding Principal of the Year.

Dietz, pictured at left with Sherri Lamerand (Illinois PTA Volunteer of the Year) and Kim Haas (Illinois PTA Teacher of the Year), is a doctoral student in the Hoffman Estates cohort of the Ed.S./Superintendent Preparation Program.

The three all represent Community Consolidated School District 15, which serves all or part of seven northwest suburban communities.

Winners of Illinois PTA awards exhibit excellence in their ability to connect with students, families and their school communities. The awards were presented earlier this month at the 116th Illinois PTA convention, held at NIU-Naperville.

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Scott Wickman

Scott Wickman (right) celebrates his award with Martina Moore, president of the Association of Humanistic Counseling.

Several faculty and students from the Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education traveled to the American Counseling Association conference in Atlanta.

Professor Scott Wickman was awarded the Humanistic Educator/Supervisor of the Year award. Chair Suzanne Degges-White received the AADA Presidential Service Award.

Counseling faculty and students delivered many presentations:

Adam Carter and Ashley S. Roberts (M.S. student in Counseling)

  • Using Grounded Theory to Understand Grief Experiences of Preschool Aged Children

Melissa Fickling

  • Work, Meaning and Purpose in Relapse Prevention: A Theoretical Integration
  • Leading the Way in Internationalization: Contributions of Professional Counseling Organizations
  • Telling Our Story: Integrating Humanism, Career and Social Justice

Kimberly Hart

  • Color Conscious Multicultural Mindfulness: A Meaningful Training Experience
  • Persons of African Descent Interpersonal Relationship and Community Violence

Dana Isawi

  • Culture and Discipline: Helping Parents Learn to Set Limits

Suzanne Degges-White

  • Publishing in Refereed Journals: Suggestions from the ACA Council of Editors
  • What do Women Want Today? Helping Women Clients Reach their Goals

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coe-winners-2018

The upcoming retirement of Barb Andree was acknowleged during the Celebration of Excellence.

The upcoming retirement of Barb Andree,
office manager for the associate dean,
also was acknowledged by the deans
during the May 4 Celebration of Excellence.

Winners of the College of Education Awards were recognized May 4 during the Celebration of Excellence.

  • Excellence in Teaching Award by Faculty/Clinical Faculty: Stacy Kelly
  • Excellence in Research and Artistry Award by Faculty: Zach Wahl-Alexander
  • Excellence in Service Award by Faculty: Jesse “Woody” Johnson
  • Exceptional Contributions by Instructor: Carolyn Riley
  • Exceptional Contributions by Civil Service Staff: Pat Wielert
  • Exceptional Contributions by Supportive Professional Staff: Margee Myles
  • Outreach / Community Service Award: Jenn Jacobs
  • Exceptional Contributions in Diversity / Social Justice Award: Joseph Flynn (not pictured)


Project VITALL group explores Consumer Electronics Show

Buddy

Buddy, “the companion robot” developed by BLUE FROG ROBOTICS. Photo by Stacy Kelly.

Stacy Kelly wants a robot.

The associate professor in the NIU College of Education’s Vision Program came to that realization after she and a trio of graduate students in the Project VITALL master’s degree program spent three days at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

“We need to have a robot,” says Kelly, who interacted with the machines and watched their realistic movements.

“People who are blind or visually impaired now often use guide dogs for traveling safely and effectively. How could a robot take the place of a guide dog? Dogs have a life expectancy. Guide dogs have to retire. People wouldn’t have to get a new dog every six or seven years. They could get a four-legged robot,” she says.

“Although the technology is not fully there now, it will be there soon, and we don’t want to wait until it’s there,” she adds. “We went to see the technology for the masses to think about how it could apply to the blind. We want to understand it now and know how it can help with our instruction.”

NIU’s group glimpsed myriad mind-boggling possibilities for robots as assistive technology for people who are blind or visually impaired – all things that the practitioners Kelly prepares through the Department of Special and Early Education must know to best serve their future clients.

She and the students – Julie Hapeman, Lizzy Koster and Lacey Long – will present their findings Feb. 15 at the 2018 Illinois Chapter of the Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired Conference.

They also plan to publish an article about their Consumer Electronic Show adventure.

Stacy Kelly

Stacy Kelly

“It was the cutting edge of all cutting edges. It was the edge of the edge of the edge. That’s where we were,” Kelly says. “Everyone there was so entrepreneurial, and it was like having a crystal ball that works in being able to see the future.”

Among the coolest things they experienced: driverless vehicles.

“We had the opportunity to ride around Las Vegas in a self-driving car and other automated transportation – self-driving buses, trolleys, things that no longer require a human to get from one place to another in a timely fashion. That was just off the charts!” Kelly says.

“One of the biggest constraints for people who are blind or visually impaired is figuring out methods of safe and independent travel,” she adds. “Now, someday, they can have a car in their garage or in the parking lot and just go.”

Called “the world’s gathering place for all those who thrive on the business of consumer technologies,” the Consumer Electronics Show “has served as the proving ground for innovators and breakthrough technologies for 50 years – the global stage where next-generation innovations are introduced to the marketplace.”

NIU’s contingent financed its trip with Project VITALL, part of a five-year, $1.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to launch of a new master’s degree that provides specialized training in assistive technology.

Both students and professor were excited to see how many smart home and voice-activated technologies were powered by Amazon Echo and Google Home.

“Everybody’s linking into the same ecosystem,” Kelly says. “We have Alexa and Google Home in our classrooms already, so it confirmed to me that we’re on the right track.”

From left: Julie Hapeman, Lacey Long, Lizzy Koster and Stacy Kelly

From left: Julie Hapeman, Lacey Long, Lizzy Koster and Stacy Kelly

 

She also realized that NIU, home to the world’s first academic program in assistive technology in the area of blindness and visual impairments, has proven prescient in its long emphasis on tech.

Just talking to the many vendors about how their technologies could have additional applications for those who are blind or visually impairment sparked light bulb moments, she adds. “People were saying, ‘Oh, for the blind! I never thought of that!’ ”

Hapeman, a certified orientation and mobility specialist in the Milwaukee Public Schools, reports that her ride in the self-driving car made “an immediate impact on two of my students.”

Julie Hapeman (center) with students Carlos and Xin Ju.

Julie Hapeman (center) with students Carlos and Xin Ju.

“As I was waiting for my turn, one of my students, a 15-year-old student who is totally blind, sent me a text to ask how I was enjoying the conference,” Hapeman says.

“The time she sent her message was the time I would have seen her for our weekly lesson, and it was serendipitous that her text arrived right after my Lyft ride had been confirmed,” she adds. “I texted her back that I was about to ride in a self-driving car, and her response was, ‘OHMYGOD! I AM SO JEALOUS!!!!’ ”

Hapeman knew she had to call her student from the car, turning the phone over to the engineer on board: “The questions she asked with all of the excitement in her voice were marvelous!”

After texting the news to another student, Hapeman realized the magnitude of those moments.

“For both of these students, the possibility that in their lifetimes they might be able to own and operate a car by themselves seemed within their grasp,” she says. “Helping these students move one step closer to one of their dreams was the greatest moment of the entire CES.”

Lacey Long

Lacey Long

Long, a teacher of students with visual impairments and a certified orientation and mobility specialist in the Morton-Sioux Special Education Unit of North Dakota, calls the Consumer Electronics Show “amazing.”

“There was such a diverse range of technology available. Our group used the opportunity to question how these technologies can be adapted for individuals with visual impairments across the board,” Long says.

“One upcoming product that I thought would be extremely useful was the Casio Mofrel 2.5D printer,” she adds. “Although it is being marketed to design professionals, it has the capabilities to print textures and Braille, which could increase the accessibility my students have to tactile illustrations for improved literacy.”

Lizzy Koster

Lizzy Koster

Koster, who has explored the potential of Google Translate for people with visual impairments, found the Las Vegas experience an informative one.

“The Consumer Electronics Show serves as a barometer for how the tech industry gauges consumer interests and needs and their response to those projections,” Koster says.

“At present, connectivity, be it through social robots or smart home innovations, is at the forefront,” she adds. “What this means for our students and clients with visual impairment is that while select innovators are developing products to better serve their needs, consumer trends are moving toward more reliance on smart devices and automation.”

For teachers, she says, “this indicates that our students and clients will need to be well-versed in basic ‘smart’ technology in order to determine how they can work with it and adapt it as necessary.”

NIU facilitates that readiness in its graduates.

“Our field desperately needs this program,” Kelly says. “All the time and energy we’ve put in for the last several decades is paying off. We’re not at Square One. We’re at Square Million. Every single day, we’re working with the newest technology and we’re bringing it into our classroom.”