Tag: Katy Jaekel

CAHE students, faculty attend Student Affairs 101 Conference

Carly Tucker and Wendall Lytle

Carly Tucker and Wendall Lytle

Ten graduate students in the Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education (CAHE) traveled recently to attend the Student Affairs 101 Conference in Normal.

The one-day conference at Illinois State University, complete with 16 workshop sessions, enabled faculty and graduate students to present their work regarding Student Affairs in higher education.

Participants examined current trends in Student Affairs to discern the difference between various types of graduate programs, to discover a wide spectrum of offices within Student Affairs and to gain an introduction to the life of a Student Affairs graduate student.

Eight of NIU’s 10 students presented during the conference.

“For the students who were able to present, it’s really great professional development for them. It allowed them to work on their presentation and communication skills,” says Danae Miesbauer, academic counselor in CAHE. “Also, the opportunity to network with other professionals in the field was definitely a positive.”

Miesbauer was joined on the trip by CAHE faculty members Katy Jaekel and Carrie Kortegast as well as Kelly Olson, professional development and operations coordinator in the NIU Division of Student Affairs, who led a panel discussion with students.

Jaekel, who also serves as faculty adviser to NIU’s Prism group, which sent some undergraduate members to the conference, also enjoyed the chance to present with those students.

101-group

NIU presentations included:

  • “Student Affairs Graduate Search: Trust the Process” (Miesbauer, Wendall Lytle and Carly Tucker)
  • “Getting the Most out of Your Graduate School Experience” (Olson, Karen Castillo, Elbia Del Llano, Eric Gorman and George Paasewe)
  • “Engaging Social Justice: Using Arts-based Methods for Inclusion in Student Organizations” (Jaekel, Ronan Kaiser, Gabriel Sonntag, Maggie Hitchcock, Kylee Warner, Alex Forgue and Elliot Davis)
  • “Google Yourself: Examining Your Digital Footprint and its Effects on Graduate School Admissions and Applying for Jobs” (Paige McConkey)
  • “Oh Yes, It Can Be Done! Campus Involvement and Degree Attainment” (Konya Sledge)

CAHE’s students participated in a pre-conference workshop at NIU to prepare. CAHE partnered with the Division of Student Affairs in the Conferencing, Presenting and Professional Networking Lunch and Learn event.

Danae Miesbauer

Danae Miesbauer

“Our students brainstormed what topics they might want to present, and we helped them with their proposals,” Miesbauer says. “I co-presented with two students and collaborated on writing and submitting a proposal. Even that is a learning process, and by going through proposal-writing in graduate school, you are more prepared when you enter the first step of your career.”

Students also received sound advice on peppering their presentations with strong examples and personal anecdotes as well as encouragement to practice and to time their talks.

“They really enjoyed the experience and learned a lot,” Miesbauer says. “They enjoyed meeting other students from around the state who also are graduate students in Student Affairs programs, making connections and finding internship opportunities. I definitely think it was positive in that regard.”

CAHE’s group came home with more than just hands-on experience, however.

“Not only did we provide a strong NIU presence,” says Suzanne Degges-White, chair of CAHE, “but our faculty staff also were successfully able to lobby to join the team of organizing schools and to get on the calendar to host the event in the fall of 2020.”

“It’s definitely an exciting and good thing for our Adult and Higher Education program,” Miesbauer adds. “This conference has been on a hosting rotation between Eastern, Western and Illinois State, and we are thrilled to be a part of that in 2020.”

101-4Miesbauer appreciates the conference’s welcoming open door policy for students.

“Having students there just contributes to the larger Student Affairs field,” she says. “The conference is a collaboration on a state level to really support our undergraduates and graduate students who are moving in to the higher education profession, and this promotes our commitment to them and the field.”

The College of Education funded registration and travel costs for students and faculty, who also were able to promote NIU’s program at the event’s Graduate School Fair.



Working the Intersections: Symposium brings practitioners in LGBTQ research to campus

working-the-intersectionsScholars who assembled at Michigan State University for the first National Symposium on LGBTQ Research in Higher Education focused on methodology and practice.

Among them that day in 2014 was Z Nicolazzo, a soon-to-be NIU College of Education professor who studies trans* collegians with a particular emphasis on trans* student resilience and kinship-building.

Nicolazzo’s memories from that event include hearing the loud-and-clear invitation for another institution to host the next gathering. Three years later, ze and Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education colleagues Katy Jaekel and Carrie Kortegast are the first to answer that call – and with a different and expanded premise in mind.

Called “Working the Intersections,” the second national symposium will take place Saturday, Oct. 14, at NIU. Researchers, faculty, staff and students from across the United States and Canada are expected to attend.

“Our theme is really thinking about how gender and sexuality show up alongside a lot of other identities and experiences,” Nicolazzo says. “We were really intentional when we called for papers.”

“When we talk about things like gender and sexuality, oftentimes particular identities are left out,” adds Jaekel, whose research agenda includes the classroom experiences of LGBTQ students. “We want to be more inclusive, and we hopefully want to generate some new knowledge.”

D-L Stewart

D-L Stewart

Keynote speaker Dafina-Lazarus (D-L) Stewart, professor of higher education and student affairs at Colorado State University, will speak at 8:30 a.m. Kristen Renn, a professor of higher, adult and lifelong education at Michigan State University, gives the closing address at 4:30 p.m.

In between are several paper-and-panel sessions, roundtable sessions and a PechaKucha plenary session, all geared to illuminate emerging knowledge, trends and conversations of LGBTQ research.

Under the “Intersections” theme, participants will discuss the experiences of LGBTQ people of color – “it’s vastly under-researched in our field,” Nicolazzo says – as well as how LGBTQ identities coexist with disability, spirituality, religion and more.

Exploring these topics is critically important, both say, especially for those in higher education.

Many faculty members and Student Affairs professionals don’t put LGBTQ issues up for discussion, Jaekel says, because such topics are often considered “value-neutral.” Others believe they don’t know enough, she adds, or are afraid to misspeak.

“While many people think that because things like gay marriage have occurred, and there’s been an increase in civil rights, that these issues have been solved and everything is better,” Jaekel says. “The truth is there continues to be a group of students who have particular needs.”

Z Nicolazzo

Z Nicolazzo

And, Nicolazzo says, that population is on the rise.

“All indications are that there are three- to six-times more people identifying as transgender below the age of 18 than over 18 – that’s our college-going demographic. We have more LGBTQ students in higher ed, and we need to meet the diversity of our students, faculty and staff in college environments,” ze says.

“We also have a growing awareness that there are LGBTQ faculty and staff at institutions of higher education,” ze adds, “so I think it’s important to not only highlight the research of those folks who are LGBTQ but to also highlight the work about LGBTQ people.”

Both are excited that a large number of students have registered to attend the symposium.

“It’s really important for students, and particularly LGBTQ students, to see what Laverne Cox calls ‘Possibility Models’ – models of who they can become in the future,” Nicolazzo says. “A lot of folks who are interested in doing research, or are interested in teaching, but identify as queer and trans* might not think they can do it because they don’t see a lot of faculty who are queer and trans*.”

“Different privileges are afforded to some and less to others, so we really wanted to highlight that,” Jaekel adds. “A lot of times, we look only to experts for knowledge and truth about gender and sexuality. Students have much to offer us, and highlighting different voices and different positions, we can learn from one another. Everyone can be deemed the expert of their own experience.”

Katy Jaekel

Katy Jaekel

The College of Education colleagues hope their participants share wisdom, gain insights, create knowledge and leave energized.

“Because I know we have so many students coming as participants, one of my main goals is for them to develop some good mentoring relationships and networks that might last beyond the conference,” Nicolazzo says.

Hir personal goals likely apply to all of the scholars coming Oct. 14.

“I’m really hoping that we can continue to practice how we share our information in ways that are understandable for the broader public,” ze says. “I’ve become really good at talking to other gender scholars about why my work matters. What I really want to become better at is making my working understandable to people who don’t do this kind of work at all.”

For more information, email LGBTQsymposium@gmail.com.