Tag: Paul M. Wright

Belizean Youth Sport Coalition takes next step as project wraps

Paul Wright

Paul Wright

Just look at the numbers.

Three years. Twenty-seven organizations. One hundred and twenty-one coaches, teachers and youth workers trained – 13 of them traveling to the United States for that preparation, partly delivered by three NIU students. Fifteen hundred youth enrolled in summer programs. Three thousand youth in school programs.

Paul Wright could go on about the Belizean Youth Sport Coalition (BYSC) project, which began in 2013 and officially wrapped up this September, but the data speaks for itself.

“I have been amazed and so grateful to the people who have contributed to making this project a success,” says Wright, a professor in the NIU Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education. “It’s been about collaboration and teamwork, and the talent, commitment and complementary skills of the U.S. team was matched by our Belizean partners.”

Funded by the U.S. Department of State’s SportsUnited program, the BYSC aimed to promote youth development and social change through sport.



Paul Wright spends sabbatical studying physical ed in Europe

Paul Wright

Paul Wright

For Paul Wright, the greater purpose of physical education is the social and emotional lessons it provides to children.

And, the professor of Kinesiology and Physical Education is happy to discover, he’s not the only one who thinks that way.

Wright is currently on a research sabbatical in Scotland, where he’s examining the approach to physical education there. He is working with several Scottish schools to observe how such learning objectives are interpreted, promoted by teachers and experienced by students.

His time in Scotland also has included presentations to physical education research and professional organizations.

“On this issue of promoting social and emotional learning through physical education, Scotland has a lot in common with the U.S. In their national curriculum, social and emotional learning outcomes are part of physical education,” Wright says.

“However, in practice, teachers have very different interpretations of what that means,” he adds. “Most of the teachers I see are very competent and doing many things right. However, their approach to teaching personal and social skills is less coordinated and less intentional than their approach to teaching psychomotor skills, fitness, etc.”



SHAPE America honors KNPE’s Paul Wright

Paul Wright

Paul Wright

(This story originally appeared in NIU Today.)

SHAPE America (Society of Health and Physical Educators) presented its Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award to NIU’s Paul M. Wright, who holds the Lane/Zimmerman Endowed Professorship in Kinesiology and Physical Education.

Wright was recognized April 7 during SHAPE America’s 131st National Convention & Expo in Minneapolis.

SHAPE America presents the Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award annually in recognition of one higher education faculty member for his or her efforts to mentor undergraduate and/or graduate students pursuing a degree in physical education, sport, kinesiology or exercise science.



Concussion and Youth Sport Panel

Community Learning Series Spring 2016According to a 2013 report released by the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, the reported number of individuals aged 19 and under treated in U.S. emergency departments for concussions and other non-fatal, sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries increased from 150,000 in 2001 to 250,000 in 2009.

The report also revealed sports associated with the highest rates of reported concussions in U.S. athletes at the high school and college levels—linking football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, and soccer to male athletes and soccer, lacrosse, and basketball to female athletes. Women’s ice hockey at the collegiate level has the highest rate of reported concussions.

Publicity surrounding brain damage among retired professional football players and research into the long-term effects of head injuries among young athletes have left parents wondering about their child’s safety on the field and prompted lawmakers nationwide to pass new laws regarding concussion in youth sports.

On March 22, the NIU College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education (KNPE) addressed these issues in a Community Learning Series event panel titled “Concussion and Youth Sport.”



College of Education’s spring 2016 Community Learning Series panel to discuss concussion in youth sports

Sharon Moskowitz

Sharon Moskowitz

Sharon Moskowitz, a NIU graduate student and life-long athlete, suffered her first concussion at 15, the result of a particularly aggressive foul during a high school basketball game. Moskowitz’s opponent hit her so hard that it broke her nose and knocked her out for a few moments. Her coached benched Moskowitz for a month – not because of the concussion but because of the broken nose. At the time, athletes were expected to shake it off after having their bell rung.

Since then Moskowitz has suffered as many as eight concussions, most recently from a ski-boarding accident that left her stuttering for a month afterward.

“Awareness of traumatic brain injury was almost non-existent while I was growing up and in college,” she said.

But that awareness is growing.

Publicity surrounding brain damage among retired professional football players and research into the long-term effects of head injuries among young athletes have left parents wondering about their child’s safety on the field and prompted lawmakers nationwide to pass new laws regarding concussion in youth sports.

The NIU College of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education will address these issues in a panel discussion titled “Concussion and Youth Sport” on Tuesday, March 22, 2016.