Come, Look, See: Blackwell celebrates classic book series

Yvonne Johnson

Yvonne Johnson

Familiar faces – at least to those of a certain age – are taking root throughout the College of Education’s Blackwell History of Education Museum and the Learning Center.

Dick, Jane and Sally, along with their parents and pets, are the stars of a sprawling new exhibition highlighting the classic “Dick and Jane” book series that helped multiple 20th century generations learn to read.

Yvonne Johnson, a longtime Sycamore educator who holds two degrees from NIU, including a 1960 master’s in Elementary Education, graciously and generously donated her vast collection of the famous and influential books to the Blackwell.

“We want to put out as many of the books as we can, and we tried to open up as many as we could,” says Steve Builta, director of Technology Innovation and Learning Services in College of Education Technology Services. “People will remember the pictures.”

Rich Casey, instructional designer in the Learning Center, heard of the opportunity from Cindy Ditzler and Lynne M. Thomas of the NIU Libraries. With the help of the NIU Foundation, the gift was completed in November 2015.

Casey and Ditzler soon visited Johnson in her Sycamore home.

Johnson taught in a one-room school for two years after earning her NIU bachelor’s degree in Home Economics Education in 1951.

Johnson chats with DeKalb Mayor Jerry Smith.

Johnson chats with DeKalb Mayor Jerry Smith.

Her career in Sycamore’s District 427 began in 1953, when she joined the staff at West Elementary School. She closed the book on her career 58 years later, and in 2013 was inducted to the Sycamore High School Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame.

“She showed us the collection, and I was amazed. I was thrilled,” Casey says. “I’m hoping to hear people say, ‘I remember that story.’ I’m hoping we’ve done some justice to it.”

Builta and Casey have accomplished just that, displaying books, framed images and enlarged prints throughout their facility in the lower level of Gabel Hall.

One glass case shows pages from Dick and Jane stories side-by-side with nearly identical words and illustrations of African-American siblings Mike and Pam – their family arrived in the 1960s amid the civil rights movement – or within religious school contexts.

Many cases are dressed with objects that vividly evoke the period of the books’ greatest popularity: wood clothespins, a rolling pin, a mop, an iron, a game of jacks, stuffed dolls, a baseball glove, a toy airplane.

“Frankly, ‘Dick and Jane’ is a real part of pop culture,” Builta says, “and this really is about bringing back some memories for some folks. ‘Reminisce’ is a great word. We’re giving people an opportunity to see this again.”

Dean Laurie Elish-Piper and Johnson enjoy the exhibition.

Dean Laurie Elish-Piper and Johnson
enjoy the exhibition.

“Dick and Jane” was the creation of Zerna Sharp, a reading consultant one-time kindergarten teacher who called the main characters “my children.”

According to a 1994 article in the Chicago Tribune:

It was in the late 1920s that Sharp, who died in 1981 at age 91, came up with the concept of an illustrated primer with simple text and repeated words mimicking the speech patterns of her young students.

Sharp had difficulty at first convincing Scott, Foresman’s editors to abandon the more stilted reading books of the era, most of which lacked illustrations. But when a University of Chicago authority on education, William S. Gray, endorsed her methods, the publisher embraced her “picture-story” method.

“She heard kids talking the way Dick and Jane would – ‘Look! Look! Look!’ – and thought that maybe the dialogue should reflect that kind of language,” Casey says.

“With the illustrations, she thought that maybe those would help kids understand what they were reading,” he adds. “There were illustrated primers, such as the New England Primer, but the difference was having the images mirror the action.”

“ ‘Dick and Jane’ were the first set of books that really utilized that concept,” Builta says.

dick-jane-4Regardless of the affection and nostalgia held by many 20th century children, however, the “Dick and Jane” books were not universally beloved. Legendary author Dr. Seuss, for example, said in 1983 that his “The Cat in the Hat” was “the book I’m proudest of because it had something to do with the death of the Dick and Jane primers.”

And although Casey was never a fan himself, he will acknowledge that the series made a huge impact on baby boomers, their parents and their children.

“Personally, I think that kids learned how to read in spite of ‘Dick and Jane.’ Our nuns were very big on phonics. I remember being in second-grade and trying to sound out ‘refrigerator,’ ” he says. “Nonetheless, ‘Dick and Jane’ was very successful.”

The Learning Center is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday. For more information, call (815) 753-1241 or email learningcenter@niu.edu.

Rich Casey, Johnson, Margaret Thacker and Steve Builta

Rich Casey, Johnson, Margaret Thacker and Steve Builta



Writing Center to open satellite location in CoE Learning Center

Gail Jacky

Gail Jacky

NIU’s Writing Center, a place “to practice critical thinking, analytical reasoning, and writing communication without fear of judgment,” will open a satellite location in the College of Education’s Learning Center this fall.

Steve Builta, director of Technology Innovation and Learning Services in College of Education Technology Services, offered the space on the lower level of Gabel Hall.

“It’s a pop-up site,” Director Gail Jacky says. “We will have a room there – most of our pop-up sites are just tables – and we’ll be there two days a week. We will have a presence there from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays beginning the third week of the fall semester.”

Jacky expects good crowds.

“We do a lot of work with College of Education students, and this makes it more convenient for them,” she says. “We spend a lot of time working with them on their teaching philosophies, their paperwork for student-teaching, their lesson plans and the actual papers they have to write.”

Headquartered in Stevenson Towers, the Writing Center logs thousands of sessions each year with undergraduates, graduate students, students-at-large, faculty and alumni – and the services go far beyond grammar, punctuation, quote integration, clarity, coherence and formatting.

computer-keysWriting coaches provide guidance on academic essays, personal statements, résumés, cover letters, websites, electronic portfolios, capstone projects, dissertations, theses, syllabi, rubrics, assignment prompts and even personal and creative writing.

Preparation for tests such as the GRE, GMAT, basic skills, SPEAK/TOFEL, CLEP and more. English Language Learners also can work to boost their abilities at the Writing Center.

Students who take advantage of the center reap the rewards on their report cards, Jacky says.

“We’ve had a few professors do some research on the students who come to the Writing Center and those who don’t, and the research shows that those who do get better grades,” she says.

“We make you better writers and more confident in what you do,” she adds. “It’s our fresh set of eyes – you know what you meant to write, but we’re reading it as an audience, and we’re helping you to clarify those ideas.”

For more information, call (815) 753-6636 or email gjacky@niu.edu.



McEvoy, Frazier set to co-teach KNPE course in college athletics

trackOne is the chair of his academic department, a respected professional in his field and an active consultant to the industry.

The other is the tremendously successful director of Intercollegiate Athletics at a Division I, Football Bowl Subdivision university that has scored several conference championships in recent years.

Both are co-teaching a course this fall in the College of Education, providing students with a real-world, from-the-trenches, theory-meets-practice view of the business side of college athletics – and what these two have lived could fill more than any textbook.

Sean T. Frazier, associate vice president and director of NIU Intercollegiate Athletics, and Chad McEvoy, chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, will team up to teach LESM 341: Administration of Intercollegiate Athletics.

“How many students can say that they have had a leading industry practitioner and a leading scholar involved in teaching their class?” says McEvoy, who previously worked in the “front offices” for the Iowa State Cyclones and the Western Michigan Broncos.

“I’m excited about that kind of dynamic classroom environment. I’ve wanted to carve out some time from my schedule to contribute to our teaching mission, and I have some background in college athletics,” he adds. “I reached out to Sean because I thought it would be an interesting way to deliver this class. We can rely on his wealth of experience and expertise.”

Sean T. Frazier

Sean T. Frazier

Frazier was game.

“This is a course,” Frazier says, “that fits right up the alley for potential sports administrators, and especially those individuals who want to know more about the collegiate side of things, from the standpoint of a practitioner who runs a FBS-Division I program. We have one of those programs here – and it makes sense that myself, our coaches and our student-athletes help out.”

Introduced last semester, the LESM 341 course introduces students to contemporary and important issues in intercollegiate athletics.

Among them: philosophies of athletics, the place of athletics in the educational curriculum, the relationship between men’s and women’s programs, budgeting, facilities, equipment, personnel, event operations management, fundraising, public relations, governance, compliance as well as other legal matters.

Guest speakers, including many of Frazier’s senior staff, department heads and coaches, and tours of athletics facilities pump up the syllabus.

“Students are really going to get the best of understanding the theory and research as well as the cutting-edge, industry best practices,” McEvoy says. “We have 20 students, a fairly small group that will promote lots of discussion and good engagement.”

Frazier expects those classroom conversations will include plenty of questions, from how he negotiates coaching contacts and multimedia rights to how he got his start and what he would count as his greatest moment.

Chad McEvoy

Chad McEvoy

NIU’s A.D. has taught before – courses in higher education leadership, policy and analysis, sometimes with a sport management component – during his stops at the University of Maine, the University of Wisconsin and Merrimack College.

He now finds himself eager to return to that vocation, even if for just one hour a week.

“When Chad brought this to me, it was something of a no-brainer for me. To sit in a classroom and facilitate a conversation about topics students are reading about is a passion of mine,” Frazier says.

Calling himself “not an old, but a seasoned administrator,” he believes the KNPE class will offer an exclusive peek inside college athletics operations: “This is what it took to get to Game Day, this is how it continues to evolve during Game Day, and this is what happens after Game Day.”

Some students might realize their career paths lies elsewhere, he adds, but others are equally as likely to grow even hungrier to follow his footsteps. Frazier knows he would have had he been provided a similar opportunity during his undergraduate days at the University of Alabama.

“Had I someone who was a sitting A.D. at any level come in and say, ‘You could do this. This could be an opportunity for you,’ I probably would’ve gotten into this earlier rather than stumbling backward into it,” says Frazier, who worked in health care and earned a master’s degree in social work to help people with substance abuse issues or developmental disabilities.

victor-e-huskieMcEvoy and Frazier are eager themselves to become students – of each other.

“I’m looking forward to understanding more about how Sean leads NIU Athletics,” McEvoy says, “and how some of the things we would pull out of a textbook, out of research or out of industry publications actually impacts NIU and other athletics departments on a daily basis.”

“Chad is a fascinating guy. I’ve learned a lot from him during our interactions,” Frazier adds. “I want to see how he articulates, communicates and runs a classroom of young people. In the future, that’s going to be something I want to pursue more. Sitting in the chair as A.D. is a passion but probably not a lifelong thing. I want to impart knowledge to the next generation.”



Fitness programs merge, improve access to wellness

Student Recreation Center

Student Recreation Center

Staying healthy is getting easier – and more affordable – at NIU.

After more than three decades of providing independent programs and services in separate and shared facilities, the College of Education’s FIT Program and University Recreation and Wellness (formerly Campus Recreation) have merged to become FitWell.

Memberships are available now at go.niu.edu/FitWell.

The move capitalizes on synergies and expertise from both departments by combining resources, boosting efficiency, streamlining membership processes and reducing confusion caused by two programs.

It also creates engaged learning experiences for students in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, thanks to the University Recreation and Wellness (RecWell) staff who are eager to serve as mentors.

“We hope that we empower and inspire people to pursue a healthy lifestyle,” RecWell Director Sandi Carlisle said. “Our primary reason for merging is to create a unified message to the campus and local community that active participation in health and wellness activities should be a life priority.”

Faculty, staff and community members who join FitWell will enjoy accessible, convenient and versatile offerings and amenities that help create and maintain healthy and happy lifestyles.

Workout facilities include the Student Recreation Center, the Chick Evans Field House, the Outdoor Rec Sports Complex, Anderson Hall Fitness Room and Pool, the Gabel Hall Fitness Room, the New Residence Hall Fitness Room and the Gilbert Hall Fitness Room.

Sandi Carlisle

Sandi Carlisle

They also will benefit from a highly economical membership fee – with a payroll deduction option – that is less expensive than those charged by other universities or private fitness clubs.

“Although our primary focus is on students, we also serve faculty, staff and community members,” Carlisle said. “We really have not concentrated on these members’ needs enough.”

Chad McEvoy, chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, calls Carlisle’s partnership proposal “a great opportunity for a cross-campus collaboration.”

“Many of our faculty and staff are dealing with challenging financial situations, so we set FitWell prices at a very competitive and affordable level,” McEvoy said. “FitWell represents a way for faculty, staff and community members to improve their fitness and wellness, and to gain the advantage of the programming and facilities have offered separately for one low price.”

The FIT program long has provided outstanding and convenient exercise opportunities along with scientifically based health and fitness education.

FIT also serves the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education through educational experiences for undergraduate and graduate students; that mission will remain intact and expand, McEvoy said. Director Vicky Books will continue to teach in the department while she stays involved with the operation and logistics of FitWell.

NIU students should not experience a negative impact from faculty, staff and community thanks to FitWell’s expanded number of sites and hours of operations, Carlisle said.

Anderson Hall pool

Anderson Hall pool

“During morning and afternoons, it is not that busy, and we have space for all members to use our facilities. We will monitor use of programs and services, and will respond to any issues that may arise,” she said.

“We typically are not incurring any additional costs by offering these memberships to faculty, staff and the community. As we generate additional revenue through memberships, our hope is to reduce user fees that students pay when they participate in a variety of RecWell programs.”

Campus Recreation members will enjoy the same benefits as before, including a free equipment orientation, a free personal training orientation, a free nutrition consultation and access to group fitness classes.

Meanwhile, the merger provides all members (including students) with access to locker and towel service, as available, without an additional fee.



A message from the dean

Laurie Elish-Piper

Laurie Elish-Piper

Welcome back! I’m so happy to see all of you after what I hope was a relaxing and productive summer.

As we mark the first day of classes each August, I always find myself incredibly invigorated and optimistic about the semester and year that await us.

This year is no different and, in many ways, I am feeling even more encouraged and excited.

Maybe it’s because we spent the last few months enjoying the amazing tweets from China and Taiwan, where our Educate Global travelers taught English to children and youth. What a marvelous program, not only transforming the lives of the young “campers” but also those of our undergraduate and graduate students. It’s impossible to measure the impact this experience will make on the U.S. classrooms where they soon will teach.

Perhaps it’s because we’ve made such impressive strides in meeting the priorities set forth in our Strategic Action Planning Framework.

June’s Social Justice Summer Camp, for example, offers just one example of an innovative practice that we’ve launched to achieve our mission. As I said during last week’s All-College Meeting, the K-12 teachers who attended that mission-critical camp were energized to talk late into the night about those questions that could lead to improved outcomes for students from diverse and historically marginalized backgrounds.

Our work to grow our college already is bearing fruit.

Enrollment notched up this summer, and our number of transfer students has risen by 32 over last year. Meanwhile, a group of 14 Dean’s Achievement Scholars is starting class today – that’s tripled from 2016-17. We also saw a 25 percent jump in the headcount of College of Education students in the University Honors Program. All of this should help us lift our retention rates even higher.

all-college-laurieResearch continues to accelerate, with more than double the number of Dean’s Research Grants last year. College of Education faculty reported approximately 170 publications and creative works. I look forward to learning about what you discover this year!

I hope all of you were able to meet Yanghee Kim, who visited campus last week in advance of her arrival in January as our new LD and Ruth G. Morgridge Endowed Chair in Teacher Education and Preparation. Yanghee has big ideas, boundless passion, a heart for collaboration and an NSF grant in search of new partners here in the College of Ed and across the university.

Speaking of new faces, we have 12 new faculty members joining us this fall. That total tells me that the university knows about, and rewards, the great work we’re doing here. Congratulations to all of you, and please know that we’re glad you’re here. We are stronger with you.

Finally, maybe I’m buoyed by the news in July that the Illinois General Assembly approved a fully funded budget for higher education. As Acting President Lisa Freeman communicated this summer: “The receipt of these funds will positively impact NIU’s cash position and alleviate stress on new and returning students who rely on MAP grants.”

Naturally, significant fiscal challenges remain. We and the university will continue to move forward with Program Prioritization and the college’s Strategic Action Planning Framework, including the necessary goal to align resources with priorities.

During these next months, I hope you’ll join Bill Pitney, David Walker and me for our new noontime Lunch Chats.

We’ll enjoy opportunities to dialogue, listen and share, so please bring your lunch, your questions and your comments. Our ears are open to your feedback and suggestions, and we’ll try to address any concerns you might have. The first two are scheduled Tuesday, Sept. 12, in Anderson 221, and Monday, Sept. 18, in Gabel 146. Dessert is on us!

Here’s to a great year!

Laurie



CoE welcomes new faculty, staff

gargoyle

Olive Goyle says, “Hello!”

Twelve new faculty members are joining the College of Education this fall, including a few familiar faces.

The roster includes Melanie Walski, who has been a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and Jenn Jacobs, who has taught and served as a Research Fellow in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education while earning her NIU doctorate in Educational Psychology.

Fatih Demir and Dongho Kim, new assistant professors in the Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment, were on campus in May as keynote speakers for the LEARN-IT conference.

Dan Oest, who taught Ed.S. courses last year as an adjunct professor in the Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations, now has joined the faculty.

“A college is defined by the strength of its faculty, so I am thrilled to welcome so many amazing new faculty to the College of Education this year,” Dean Laurie Elish-Piper said.

“We were able to hire a large group of incredibly accomplished, motivated and productive faculty who will help us enhance our programs, expand our research productivity, build engaged learning opportunities and teach and mentor our students.”

Other new employees this fall include Alicia Anderson, who is administrator of Finance and Operations Analysis; Tony Calderala, academic advisor in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education; Claire Duvall, online program support specialist in the Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment; and Judy Schneider, director of Advancement.

Here is a closer look at this fall’s new members of the College of Education family.

Department of Counseling, Adult and Higher Education

Melissa Fickling

Melissa Fickling

Melissa Fickling comes to NIU by way of Memphis, Tenn. She completed her doctoral work in Counseling and Counselor Education in 2015 at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Her primary research interests are focused on the intersections of work, mental health and meaning.

She has practiced professional counseling in higher education, community and private practice settings, and is a licensed clinical professional counselor in Illinois. She is a member of the editorial review board for the Journal of College Counseling and active in leadership for the National Career Development Association.

“Melissa has a wealth of professional experience that she will bring to the classroom: seven years of work in the Chicagoland area before she became a professor. Her research interest in the intersection of work and mental health is really a great help to our university because the clients our graduates work with in this area often are dealing with issues of underemployment or employment.” — Suzanne Degges-White, chair

Dana Isawi

Dana Isawi

Dana Isawi holds a doctorate degree in counselor education and supervision from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and a master’s degree in school counseling from Marymount University.

She has clinical experience in the school and community settings both in the United States and internationally. She has experience in intervention development, implementation and evaluation.

Her research and presentations focus on multicultural issues in counseling, play therapy and children, especially survivors of trauma and interventions to enhance career and college readiness of students. She has experience in teaching a variety of graduate courses in school counseling, mental health counseling and play therapy and filial therapy as well as supervising graduate students.

“Dana’s area of specialty is trauma, especially refugee traumatization. This is a growing area of interest and need because of what the current political climate is doing to people who are refugees or immigrants. She also has critical counseling experience mainly working with children as well as children from very diverse backgrounds, which is a very necessary piece for our students.” — Degges-White

Xiaodan Hu

Xiaodan Hu

Xiaodan Hu obtained her Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration and Policy from the University of Florida in Gainesville, where she served as a research fellow at the Institute of Higher Education. She also holds a master’s degree in Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education from Texas A&M University.

She teaches courses related to community college leadership; finance and policy; and higher education administration.

Her research typically employs quantitative methods to examine the impact of state policies and institutional initiatives on colleges and universities, focusing on educational equity issues of historically underserved students and non-traditional students. She also recently has written on the impact of performance-based funding, the pathway of upward transfer, and gender differences in STEM degree attainment.

“Xiaodan brings a depth of experience in community college leadership. While she was at the University of Florida, she was the program director of the Community College Futures Assembly, an organization devoted to enhancing the professional skills of community college executives. Finding someone with community college experience, combined with her quantitative research expertise, is needle-in-a-haystack.” — Degges-White

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Melanie Walski

Melanie Walski

Melanie Walski holds a Ph.D. Curriculum & Instruction: Language, Literacy & Culture from the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.A.Ed. (Reading Specialist) from Dominican University.

She teaches courses in Elementary School Developmental Reading Programs, Emerging Literacy and Beginning Reading Instruction through Age 8 and Organizing for Effective Elementary Reading Instruction.

Her research interests focus on the intersection of literacy and policy at the elementary level. Her research centers on how literacy instructional practice is affected by policy, and what aspects of policy are most influential on teachers’ sense-making of literacy teaching and learning. She is also interested in emergent literacy curriculum development.

“The Department of Curriculum and Instruction is fortunate that Melanie Walski is joining us. As a former classroom teacher and certified reading specialist, Melanie brings both experience and valuable expertise to her role in many of our programs. Her research interests in policy and literacy will help to improve literacy education, policy and research at the local, state and national levels. Melanie also will help us offer our students superior content knowledge, methods development and theory-to-practice approach to prepare them to become outstanding educators.” — Donna Werderich, acting chair

Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment

Fatih Demir

Fatih Demir

Fatih Demir graduated in 2009 from the University of Baltimore, earning the degree of Doctor of Communications Design. In August 2015, he joined to the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri as postdoctoral fellow.

Demir teaches courses in Human-Computer Interaction and User Experience Research and Design.

He has spent years teaching and researching Human Computer Interaction; Usability; Interaction Design; Social Media Analysis; and E-government Design. He has conducted research at the Information Experience Lab using remote and mobile eye tracking systems. He also worked with Mizzou faculty, staff and graduate assistants on various projects in the realm of journalism, education, medicine and computer science.

“Fatih will enhance our curriculum and research in the area of user experience. Back in the old days, we talked about usability. Now we talk about user experience. For everything we design, we need to make sure that our users – our learners – accept it and are willing to enjoy it. It’s about understanding that designing is not just about designing something you like; it’s about designing something everyone likes while making sure that everyone can learn from it.” — Wei-Chen Hung, chair

Dongho Kim

Dongho Kim

Dongho Kim earned his Ph.D. in Learning, Design and Technology in May from the University of Georgia-Athens, where he worked with Robert Branch on research related to student engagement and online learning. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Education from Seoul National University.

Kim will continue to build his research at NIU while teaching courses in interaction design and “learning analytics.”

Published in a number of prestigious journals, he won first place for Outstanding Journal Article Award in the Distance Learning Division of the AECT 2016 conference for his most recent article in The Internet and Higher Education. He also received a two-year research fellowship grant (2016-18) from the Hewlett Foundation to continue his research.

“ ‘Learning analytics’ is one of the fields that is growing in instructional technology because it is important to make sense of data and to use that data to enhance learning and training. Technology and data are so widely available now that sometimes it is difficult to understand the data, and it is very challenging to interconnect all this data to find better solutions for learning and training. Dongho is the person who will help us address that need. He knows how to bring those different types of data together to design curriculum that improves learning.” —Hung

Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education

Clayton Camic

Clayton Camic

Clayton L. Camic earned a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2011. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science from Morehead State University (2001) and a master’s degree in Exercise Physiology from the University of Wyoming (2003).

Camic will teach courses in Applied Physiology of Exercise (KNPE 452), Neuromuscular Aspects of Performance (KNPE 514) and Bioenergetics (KNPE 652).

His main research interests include the evaluation of neuromuscular function and fatigue using electromyography as well as nutritional supplements as ergogenic aids.

“Clay has established a record over the last several years of becoming a leading scholar in the Exercise Physiology area, including more than 50 refereed publications in the last five years. He truly enhances the scholarship for students in our Kinesiology program.” — Chad McEvoy, chair

Jenn Jacobs

Jenn Jacobs

Jenn Jacobs, who earned her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from NIU, also holds a master’s degree in Sport Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

She has taught courses in psychological aspects of sport and exercise, measurement for evaluation, psychology of sport and exercise, psychology of coaching and the culture and society of sports.

Her research interests include sport-based youth development, transfer of life skills, sport for social change and social and emotional learning. In 2012, she received a fellowship from NIU’s Collaborative on Early Adolescence to support youth learning and development by working with Paul Wright on the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility model.

“Jenn is someone who has been here at NIU for some time, working on her Ph.D. and collaborating on research with Paul Wright and other KNPE colleagues. She’s has begun to establish a record as a strong teacher and scholar with great potential in both of those areas.” — McEvoy

Claire Schaeperkoetter

Claire Schaeperkoetter

Claire Schaeperkoetter, who hails from Columbia, Mo., double-majored in Psychology and Spanish at Washington University in St. Louis. She received both her Master’s and PhD in Sport Management from the University of Kansas.

Schaeperkoetter has worked in the ticket office for the Miami Heat and the athletics compliance offices at the University of Miami and the University of Kansas. While pursuing her Ph.D., she served an instructor of record for several different Sport Management undergraduate courses at the University of Kansas.

Her research typically relies on the intersection of organizational behavior, organizational theory and sport finance to analyze decisions of sport leaders, sport employees and sport participants.

“Claire has already become nationally known for her scholarship during her doctoral studies at the University of Kansas, and she will really help to grow our Sport Management offerings. She is an excellent teacher with great research potential.” — McEvoy

Emerson Sebastião

Emerson Sebastião

Emerson Sebastião, a visiting assistant professor, earned a Ph.D. in Kinesiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2015. He then received a fellowship from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to complete a post-doctoral training in Rehabilitation Sciences in the same institution.

He joined the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health of the University of Illinois as a visiting assistant professor in 2016, serving as the director of the Exercise Neuroscience Research Laboratory and teaching courses related to exercise psychology and physical activity research methods.

Sebastião studies elderly and clinical populations by exploring factors that influence physical activity as well as creative ways to promote physical activity among older adults and persons with multiple sclerosis.

“Emerson has outstanding training from the University of Illinois. His research is a great fit with our Kinesiology faculty, and he brings with him a lot of potential in terms of publication and grant activity.” — McEvoy

Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations

Dan Oest

Dan Oest

Dan Oest, whose July 1 retirement closed the book on a 33-year career in K-12 education, comes to NIU from Richmond-Burton Community High School District 157 and Nippersink School District 2.

Oest spent 29 years in school administration, the last 21 of those as a superintendent. For 10 of his 12 years in Richmond-Burton, he also served as a shared superintendent with Nippersink.

He holds two degrees from NIU – an M.S.Ed. and Ed.D. – as well as a bachelor’s degree from Western Illinois University and an Ed.D. from National Louis University.

This fall, Oest will supervise the superintendent interns and teach LEAA 710: The Superintendency.

“Dan brings a wealth of experience, having been an educator for many years and superintendent in the region for the last 12 years. He is poised to provide excellent mentorship for our students, current knowledge of school policies to the classrooms and relationships with a variety of school districts in the area. He is the perfect fit for the position of coordinator of the Ed.S. program because of his background as a practitioner and his experience teaching in higher education. Most of our students intend to follow the same job trajectory that he did, making him an excellent role model.” — Teresa A. Wasonga, Presidential Engagement Professor and Fulbright Scholar, Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations

Department of Special and Early Education

Natalie Andzik

Natalie Andzik

Natalie Andzik is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University, where she earned her degree in Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis. She also obtained Board Certification in Behavior Analysis in 2012.

Andzik’s passion for helping students with severe disabilities started as a special education teacher in California, where she taught for eight years.

Her current research is focused on supporting the communication independence of students with disabilities by ensuring practitioners use the most effective evidence-based practices. She has published articles related to special education and applied behavior analysis in a variety of journals, including Exceptional Children, Teaching Exceptional Children and TASH.

She will teach several sections of Collaboration for Inclusive Teaching and Learning this fall.

“Natalie brings with her experience teaching children with disabilities; experience teaching undergraduate and graduate teacher candidates in higher education; successful internal grants; and numerous publications. Teacher education candidates will appreciate her real-world experience, her positive energy and enthusiasm, her sense of humor and her collaborative nature.” — Greg Conderman, chair



Elementary Ed major honored for internship in Streamwood

Kelsi Spain

Kelsi Spain

Kelsi Spain began her college career studying business, but she soon realized that her heart longed instead to major in Elementary Education.

“I don’t want just to teach academic subjects,” says Spain, an NIU College of Education senior from Pingree Grove, Ill. “I want to change my students’ lives.”

Spain is already doing exactly that.

During her professional teaching placement semester this spring, she spent half of her time in an elementary school classroom and the rest of her hours as an AVID tutor in U-46’s Streamwood High School.

The AVID program encourages teachers not to simply feed facts but to empower students to learn on their own, a method she followed while tutoring high school students in whatever topics or homework they brought with them.

“We kind of guide our students through collaborating together so they can figure it out for themselves,” Spain says. “I’m just there to facilitate, and if they’re really stuck, I’ll step in.”

Although she plans to teach in the elementary grades, she is confident that her immersion in AVID has prepared her to provide “a unique, challenging and engaging education” to her future students: “The two worlds are not so different.”

Her exemplary work, which she continued daily even after NIU’s semester ended May 12, has resulted in an “Intern of the Month” award for Spring 2017 from NIU Career Services. Seven recipients are chosen throughout the calendar year; three of those will receive Intern of the Year scholarships.

spain-kelsi-2She is excited for the distinction but more grateful for the opportunities to practice her teaching.

“You get to see those students every day, and it’s amazing to see how they change. They’re about to embark on this next chapter of their lives – and, with me being a college student, I can give them that first-hand experience,” she says.

“Being in the classroom with students so close to me in age gave me a confidence boost to recognize that I can be viewed as a young professional,” she adds, “and that I have what it takes to relate to students of all ages.”

Jennifer Johnson, director of Teacher Preparation and Development for the College of Education, supported Spain’s application. Johnson has observed Spain’s “professionalism and leadership in multiple contexts and settings.”

“Ms. Spain has been characterized by her integrity, dependability and strong interpersonal skills,” Johnson wrote. “I am confident that she will continue to excel at meeting the academic expectations of her coursework while making meaningful contributions to the campus community and in our partner school districts.”

Patricia Maynard, AVID coordinator at Streamwood High School, also endorsed Spain’s work.

“Kelsi did a great job in providing the structure and facilitating the questioning that goes with this type of tutorial process. It helps to have a strong base knowledge in difficult subject areas – i.e., calculus, trigonometry and physics – and Kelsi had that,” Maynard wrote.

“There is also an expectation that our college students act as role models for our students. Again, Kelsi’s ability to connect to her students was an asset,” she continued. “I think she will do a great job as an educator- she has the right combination of intelligence, confidence and attitude.”



Annie Glidden Heritage Garden continues to bloom outside CoE

Gary Swick

Gary Swick

Gary Swick views gardening as fundamental to the future.

“We live in a society that thinks that food comes from a drive-up window or, at best, a refrigerator,” says Swick, an adjunct instructor of Foundations of Education in the NIU Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations.

“I think that people growing their own food, or being involved in growing food, is really going to be a key thing for us in getting our culture back,” he adds. “Part of that is connecting to the natural environment, and we can’t really expect people to protect something they don’t care about.”

As a longtime educator, Swick knows that the most effective way to change a culture’s deeply ingrained mindset is through young children who are still learning about their world.

Planting those seeds is the mission of the Annie Glidden Heritage Garden, a plot of four raised beds tilled two years ago near the Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center.

Swick assigns his College of Education students to create and plan lessons in math, science, social studies and language arts based on the garden.

They realize through that process that gardens are powerful teaching tools as well as valuable resources for schools, he says, and become more likely to carry that back-to-the-earth philosophy into their eventual classrooms.

He credits NIU’s Communiversity Gardens as his inspiration. “I was in the right place at the right time. I am one of the faculty co-advisers, with Melissa Burlingame,” Swick says.

Dan Kenney, a key player in the Communiversity Gardens initiative, later helped Swick to construct the Annie Glidden Heritage Garden. “I told Dan that I wanted this teaching garden, and he made it happen. We wrote a dean’s grant, and I received it,” he says.

annie-glidden-1“I got it in my mind that gardening is a skill that every teacher from Northern Illinois University should walk away with if they’re not afraid to put their hands in the soil,” adds Swick, a retired environmental sciences teacher from Dundee-Crown High School.

“You can experience the magic of a child planting a seed, and being able to see that something they can eat comes from it later.”

Connecting that sense of awe and wonder to academics can bear great fruit, he says.

If students are excited over the miracle of seeds turning into plants, he says, imagine the poetry they might write! Imagine their curiosity to know where vegetables came from, how people used those crops over the centuries and their cultural significance to their countries of origin!

Lessons aren’t restricted to vegetable gardens, he adds, mentioning flower gardens and even rock gardens.

“This is really limitless,” he says. “The only limit is people’s imaginations.”

Equally limitless are the possibilities for society if today’s children embrace gardening in a way that matches Swick’s vision.

First, he says, naturally grown foods promote good nutrition, improve health and challenge business.

“You can grow food for way cheaper than you can buy it,” he says. “I’m a believer that consumers control the marketplace. That’s how capitalism works. If people understand their food better, if we start rejecting certain kinds of food, if we can start liking the crunch of carrots and celery instead of potato chips – then the food companies are not going to make it.”

annie-glidden-2Second, he foresees greater civility among humanity.

“Our human culture is not on a sustainable path. We’ve got all of this violence and squabbling. But everybody eats. Everybody has to have food,” he says.

“If you look at a supermarket, people are independent. They’re rushing through, loading up carts, not interacting, being controlled by the marketing on the packages,” he says.

“At a farmers market,” he adds, “it’s a community experience. Conversations take place. Relationships are developed. People are willing to pay more money for something than they would in the supermarket because they know who’s producing it, they know what they’re getting and, in some cases, they can have some control over it.”

Next on Swick’s wish list is a pair of aeroponic gardens, indoor tower-shaped gardens that spray water onto the roots rather than immersing the roots.

He wrote a dean’s grant to obtain one model for the classroom and another for the Learning Center in Gabel Hall; the towers demonstrate the ability of year-round, indoor food production.

Meanwhile, he’s already doing his part to put gardens into tiny hands. First-graders from NIU’s Campus Child Care are watering and weeding the Annie Glidden Heritage Garden while their college-age counterparts are home for the summer.



Visual Impairments grad student hopes to improve lives, system

Lizzy Koster

Lizzy Koster

When Lizzy Koster graduated from Hendrix College in Arkansas, she took a job as an assistant at a political consulting firm. It didn’t last long.

“Politics wasn’t what I imagined it would be,” says Koster, an NIU College of Education graduate student with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and anthropology.

Because she had always nurtured an interest in health care, she soon found herself working at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. Her skillset quickly grew to include the processing of medical paperwork, knowledge she deemed valuable for future endeavors.

Yet another career – one woven into her DNA – beckoned.

“Education is a family business of ours,” says Koster, a native of Elmhurst, Ill. “My aunt went through the NIU Vision Program, and she went on to work in the Chicago Public Schools. She called me and said it would be a great fit for me. Kapperman actually called me, too.”

Kapperman is Gaylen Kapperman, who joined NIU’s program in visual impairments in 1974 and remains active in the Department of Special and Early Education as a Professor Emeritus. He and colleague Stacy Kelly are relentless recruiters for the graduate programs, which offer free tuition, fees and health insurance along with stipends to woo more professionals into a critically understaffed field.

Gaylen Kapperman

Gaylen Kapperman

Now Koster is on her way to a career as a teacher of the visually impaired and as a specialist in assistive technology as well as orientation and mobility. She also has joined Kapperman in conducting research and writing several manuscripts, one of which has been accepted for publication in a referred journal.

“Vision is a good fit for me,” says Koster, 27. “I love working with people and with different cultures, and when you work in special education, it’s kind of inevitable. You come in contact with kids from different backgrounds, and you have to come at them with an understanding approach.”

Gaining early experience through substitute-teaching at the School Association for Special Education in DuPage County has provided confirmation of her new direction.

“I feel like educators, in public schools specifically, are so pressed to get the right test scores,” she says.

“But with vision, although our students might participate in that statewide or national testing, their benchmarks are so different. Vision is not so much about grades but in giving them life skills and even social skills. Seeing them make a friend is such a big deal,” she adds. “Their goals might not translate to academic grades but to really improving their quality of life, and being able to watch them achieve their personal goals is so exciting.”

She also is eager to exercise her love of languages.

Her interest in learning Spanish began at age 3, when her grandfather gave her a book about Mexico. Her fluency blossomed as she studied Spanish from second-grade through high school.

koster-lizzy-3As an undergrad at Hendrix, she enrolled in a course on social justice and human rights in Argentina, traveled throughout the region and spent her junior year as a study abroad student in Brazil. Before embarking, of course, she taught herself Portuguese.

During the summer after her junior year of high school, she studied in Spain.

One summer later after her graduation, she volunteered in Paraguay, where she learned the indigenous language of Guarani.

True to form, she also learned Braille on her own before coming to NIU in August 2016.

Language, naturally, is the focus of research Koster has conducted and presented with Kapperman at the conference of the Illinois Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired.

“Kapperman is interested in a research project using a screen-reading technology for those who are completely blind or who need that vocal feedback,” she says. “We’re also working on figuring out Google Translate and other means of using screen-readers for those who are learning a foreign language or for whom English is not a first language.”

Following her graduation in August 2018, Koster won’t close the book on college just yet.

koster-lizzy-2She plans to earn a doctoral degree that will prepare her for administrative roles in special education – that’s where her experience in processing medical paperwork will come in handy – or to serve as an advocate for teachers.

“My biggest interest is in benefiting the system, helping all of the working parts – students, teachers, aides and assistants, families – to operate a bit more smoothly,” she says.

But the advocacy role might tackle an even greater concern, she says: teacher burnout.

“If there’s a way to make people stay in the field, that’s ultimately helping the students, too. They need that longevity and consistency,” Koster says. “If I could help people to achieve that, then that would be great.”



Paul Wright begins second term of KNPE endowed professorship

Paul Wright

Paul Wright

When Paul Wright first acquired the title of EC Lane and MN Zimmerman Endowed Professor in Kinesiology and Physical Education, he knew exactly what he wanted to do.

Publish research. Secure grants. Forge international partnerships. Serve as an ambassador for the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education. Promote the concept of Physical Education’s unique role in social and emotional learning.

Three years later, with all of those goals accomplished and his endowed professorship recently renewed for another term, Wright finds himself at another threshold.

“Reflecting on what I’ve been able to accomplish with this additional support in the past few years is prompting me to think, ‘OK, what am I going to do now?’ ” says Wright, who joined NIU in 2011.

“I’m very pleased with what I’ve done. I’ve got wind under my wings,” he adds. “As I think what I can aspire to, it’s next-level things. I can reach for something I couldn’t reach for otherwise, and this additional support is going to make the difference. It’s really exciting. What an opportunity!”

Building on the foundation established during the first term of his professorship, Wright seeks to make his mark – and his department’s – in the field.

He hopes to publish research that impacts and influences peers who are reading the top journals.

Paul M. WrightData collected in his recent study in Scotland, combined with parallel data collected by his team in the United States and colleagues in New Zealand, will provide a good start. “This project will be the largest one of its type exploring social and emotional learning in physical education,” Wright says. “It will pack a wallop.”

Meanwhile, he wants to continue his steady stream of external funding by going after even larger prizes.

For example, the U.S. Department of State supplied $225,000 for Wright’s Belizean Youth Sport Coalition project in 2014. He’s now in pursuit of a $600,000 grant from the State Department, and believes he’s in good standing to obtain highly competitive grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Next year already will see the launch of an externally funded project in Sri Lanka, similar to the one in Belize, that promotes positive youth development and social change through sport.

Wright’s global initiatives also caught the attention of UNESCO, the leaders of which have asked the NIU professor to serve as a consultant and voice at the table to guide the planning of international policy conferences.

Closer to home, he’s working to convince the Chicago-based Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning to nationally recognize as a best practice the pedagogy model he researches.

“If I can get this endorsement of the work we specialize in, that will bring credibility and high-profile, external validation,” he says. “We’ll have very esteemed organizations giving us the nod, and promoting our work.”

Chad McEvoy, chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, believes Wright already is an “international leader in his field” who perfectly matches the description of the EC Lane and MN Zimmerman Endowed Professor framework.

Chad McEvoy

Chad McEvoy

“In creating this professorship, Drs. Lane and Zimmerman expressed a passion for enabling NIU students able to study under the very best faculty. That’s a powerful thing with an endowed professorship: the ability and the resources to go out and secure a truly elite and nationally recognized faculty member and scholar,” McEvoy says. “Certainly, Paul Wright fits that bill.”

The benefits extend beyond students, he adds.

“One of Paul’s real strengths is his ability to collaborate,” McEvoy says, “and what he’s been able to accomplish with the professorship is not just exceptional work on his part but in getting a number of his colleagues involved in that work.”

For Wright, that’s the point.

“An individual holds an endowed professorship, but the idea is to build the reputation of the whole department,” he says. “Personally, with these high-profile activities, if they’re good for me, then they’re good for the department. It’s wins across the board. We want KNPE on the radar.”