KNPE scholarships impact lives

Corina Salinas

Corina Salinas

Corina Salinas played sports in high school and college, including track and water polo.

“With any athlete, you’re always going to be in some sort of pain. It just depends on your perception of that pain,” says Salinas, a fifth-year senior from the South Side of Chicago. “That always intrigued me. Every human being has a different perception of pain, and a different level of pain. I wanted to learn more.”

Katherine Kendall had her eyes on a career in nursing. She took all the right courses at Illinois Valley College and worked as a CNA in a local nursing home and hospital, but soon discovered “something missing.”

“It didn’t fit me,” says Kendall, a senior from Mendota, Ill. “I shadowed everyone in the physical therapy department, and I instantly connected with the athletic trainers and the goals they set for their profession. I completely fell in love with athletic training from then on.”

Katherine Kendall

Katherine Kendall

Salinas and Kendall both followed their passions to the NIU Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, where they are recipients this year of Lela Trager Scholarships worth $5,000 each.

Other Lela Trager recipients this year are Hillary Allton, Katie Dyke, Samantha Galicia, Karlie Grove, Brianna Kraft, Ariel Russell, Laura Tuma and Mary Welch. Total scholarship dollars awarded to KNPE students this year exceed $75,000.

“We are blessed to have many donors to KNPE who are so generous with their financial support,” department chair Chad McEvoy says. “These gifts are truly impactful in assisting our high-quality students and their families in their ability to pay for school.”

For Salinas, the Lela Trager has allowed her to quit half of her part-time jobs.

“I used to have four on-campus jobs, working day and night. I woke up early to open the pool, and I worked late at night to close the front desk,” Salinas says.

“Now I have only two jobs, which has opened up time for studying and made a difference in my homework and exams. I also have more time for myself to stay physically active, and I’m actually staying sane because I’m getting more sleep.”

The native Spanish speaker, who transferred to NIU from Monmouth College, hopes to work on the athletic training team at NASA.

Corina Salinas

Corina Salinas

“I’m really reaching for the stars,” she says. “It’s just fascinating to me how astronauts come back inches taller, and can’t go on with their daily activities because of the gravitational pull. For them to live their lives without any struggles, it’s very important for us to understand how outer space modifies their bodies.”

She believes the program is preparing her well.

“There’s just a lot thrown at you as a student. No matter what, I’m always learning something – in clinicals, in class, in labs. Everywhere I turn, there’s always an opportunity to learn something new, and that’s the beauty of it all,” she says.

“Professionalism is a huge part of athletic training, and they’re really good at portraying that to us,” she adds. “We’re representing ourselves as professionals in the field. We’re representing NIU, the program we’re in and athletic trainers all over the world. We don’t train people on exercise. We help people therapeutically and rehabilitate them.”

Meanwhile, she’s found confidence to step out of her comfort zone.

“A go-getter is what people call me nowadays,” Salinas says. “I’m going after what I love, and being passionate about what I want.”

For Kendall, who also received $1,000 from the college-awarded EXCEL (Extending College of Education Learning) Fund, simply talking about the impact of scholarships stirs raw emotions.

“Honestly, these are the first scholarships I’ve ever won, and I even cried a little bit. I was absolutely ecstatic to see those acceptance letters,” she says.

“I was able to take less of a workload – last semester, I was working four jobs and going to school full time. It was a very hard struggle for me,” she adds. “With the scholarships, I’m really able to make my last semester of academic classes go by so much smoother.”

Katherine Kendall

Katherine Kendall

Kendall’s recent clinical site – the NIU Huskies football team – was an exciting one.

“I absolutely love the atmosphere,” she says. “I definitely can see myself doing that in the future, maybe at a Division I college. I don’t want to limit myself to football, but I do enjoy the high volume of work.”

She’s also considering graduate school and even a civilian career in athletic training for the U.S. military. An internship at a U.S. Naval base in North Carolina this semester is offering her a glimpse at that career, which is an emerging field away from the sports field.

No matter what direction she chooses, she is confident in the preparation the NIU College of Education is providing.

“One of the top qualities in not just the athletic training program, but in the KNPE department in general, is that you can go to any professor or instructor and say, ‘Hey, I really need help with this,’ and they’re always happy to help you,” she says. “They’re really motivated to get you on the path you want to go.”

Daily lessons turn quickly into applied knowledge, she adds.

After the first semester of observing athletic trainers at work, she says, “the great thing about the AT program is that, with all the classes you take, you’re also set into a clinical rotation.”

“Everything you’re learning in the classroom you’re able to experience hands-on at your clinical site, whether it’s lower extremity that second semester, applying those special tests or performing those evals,” she says, “or fourth semester, taking general medicine, looking at different medications and listening to heart and lung sounds.”

Preceptors at clinical sites offer more perspective.

“You can take what you’re learning in your lectures and say, ‘Hey, we learned this. How does this work? How do you use this in your day-to-day life?’ I’m seeing that everything applicable to my future as a certified athletic trainer, and literally everything that I learn is applied into my daily work at the clinical setting.”

Chad McEvoy, Abigail Omerza and Yoshi Takei

Chad McEvoy, Abigail Omerza and Yoshi Takei

KNPE Scholarship Recipients

Lela Trager Scholarship ($5,000)
2016-17: Hillary Allton, Katie Dyke, Samantha Galicia, Karlie Grove, Katherine Kendall, Brianna Kraft, Ariel Russell, Corina Salinas, Laura Tuma, Mary Welch
2017-18: Kaitlin Allen, Hillary Allton, Jazmyn Anderson, Carissa Atiles, Mary Bailey, Jade Gray, Grace Harris, Ashley Horn, Kelsey Knake, Brianna Kraft, Sarah Llort, Christina Pitts, Maria Reyes, Ariel Russell, Corina Salinas, Emily Siekiersi, Kristina Wenk

Tim Gullikson Education Memorial Scholarship ($3,510, awarded by the college)
2016-17: Richard Snedeker
2017-18: Craig Kelly, Annie Malecki

Miriam Anderson Scholarship ($2,250)
2016-17: Aaron Essex, Craig Kelly, Amber Mysliwiec
2017-18: Ashley Horn, Craig Kelly, Annie Malecki, Kristina Wenk

Margaret May Duncan Scholarship ($2,200)
2016-17: Kristina Wenk
2017-18: Sarah Llort

Lou Jean Moyer Scholarship ($1,500)
2016-17: Donovan Benson, Jeffrey Nicholls
2017-18: Christian Cores, Josh Henley, Annie Malecki

Physical Education Scholarship ($1,500)
2016-17: Anna Ostrander
2017-18: Sarah Paver

Stroup-Dunn Scholarship ($1,300)
2016-17: Abigail Omerza
2017-18: Luis Hernandez

Dr. Joan Popp Scholarship ($1,200)
2016-17: Anna Ostrander
2017-18: Emily Siekierski

Nikita Lopez and Paul Wright

Nikita Lopez and Paul Wright

Linda Kay Barnes Scholarship ($1,100)
2016-17: Sharon Moskowitz
2017-18: Sarah Paver

EXCEL (Extending College of Education Learning) Fund ($1,000, awarded by the college)
2016-17: Mackenzie Baird, Katherine Kendall, Chris Orange

Elizabeth Patterson Scholarship ($1,000)
2016-17: John Neal
2017-18: Chris Orange

SHAPE Major of the Year ($1,000)
2016-17: Anna Ostrander
2017-18: TBA

Al Kranz Scholarship ($900)
2016-17: Max Finley
2017-18: Grant Panzella, Dong Park

Circle of Gold – classes of 1949-1953 ($900, awarded by the college)
2016-17: Anna Ostrander

Samuel and Adelaide Rockwood Scholarship ($800, awarded by the college)
2016-17: Ariel Russell
2017-18: Vashae Easley, Jade Gray

Judith Bischoff Scholarship ($600)
2016-17: Nicholas Minogue, Grant Panzella
2017-18: Nicholas Maruyama, Ross William

Huskie Award ($150)
2016-17: Nikita Lopez
2017-18: TBA

Outstanding Student Awards ($100)
2016-17: Davoncie Granderson (B.S. Kinesiology), Kayla Hierholzer (M.S.Ed.), Nikita Lopez (Physical Education), Samantha Lucente (Athletic Training), Connor Schomig (Sport Management)
2017-18: TBA



April 21, 25 offer two great ways to back College of Ed students

Two upcoming events will provide great opportunities for NIU College of Education faculty and staff to show their support of students.

CoE Student Research Symposium

researchStudents, faculty and staff are encouraged to attend the second annual CoE Student Research Symposium, scheduled from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 21, in the Learning Center of Gabel Hall.

As students learn about the process of research and academic inquiry, they can share outcomes of their research, creative works, scholarly activity and research ideas. They also can display their work during the poster session, explore research methods related to their own interests and learn how to become involved with faculty research.

Participants can present ideas at a Table Talk Session and obtain valuable advice on how to accomplish their research goals.

For more information, email Pat Weilert at pweilert@niu.edu or Bill Pitney at wpitney@niu.edu.

Student Appreciation Day

Student Appreciation Day 2016

Student Appreciation Day 2016

To celebrate CoE students, College of Education Student Services will once again host Student Appreciation Day from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, at the main entrance of Gabel Hall and the second-floor south lobby of Anderson Hall.

Students will feast on free hot dogs, chips and beverages. They also can sign up for the annual raffle with prizes donated by local businesses.

Help is needed to make this a truly special day. Student Services invites faculty and staff to support this effort by handing out food and beverages and mingling with students.

To volunteer, email Brittany Hall at bhall12@niu.edu to provide your availability, contact information and preferred location.

Name:
Department:
Phone:
Preferred location: Gabel Hall or Anderson Hall
Times you are available (please select one or more):

  • 11:30 a.m. to noon
  • Noon to 12:30 p.m.
  • 12:30 to 1 p.m.

For more information, contact Hall at (815) 753-8352 or bhall12@niu.edu.



Judy Schneider named director of College of Ed advancement

Judy Schneider

Judy Schneider

Judy Schneider, a gift planning officer in the NIU Foundation since 2012, has joined the College of Education as director of Advancement.

Schneider is continuing her mission to find the “hope” delivered through donor-funded scholarships and dollars that fuel innovative programs.

“I am excited to work in the College of Education for a variety of reasons,” Schneider says.

“For one, I have met such great alumni and friends from the college over the past 10-plus years. Their work is critical as educators, administrators, counselors and more in improving so many issues this country faces,” she says. “And I really think I can help connect these alumni and friends with the needs of the college and their personal philanthropic goals.”

Coming to the College of Education also will allow her to “narrow my focus a bit” as she collaborates with “a great group of people for a common goal,” she adds.

Meanwhile, the move to Graham Hall 316 surrounds the mother of four – three of her children are enrolled in Illinois public universities, including NIU – with bright, talented and eager students.

“There is nothing more motivating than hearing a young person’s dream for a better life, and helping make that possible. It is their stories that fire me up to do what I do,” she says. “A saying I really like is, ‘By Giving We Find Hope.’ Scholarships, and funds for programs, create that hope. It is what keeps me on task.”

Anthony D’Andrea

Anthony D’Andrea

Anthony D’Andrea, senior director of College-Based Advancement for the NIU Foundation, is proud of his colleague’s new role at the university. Schneider joined the Foundation in 2007 as a development associate and then assistant to the director of Gift Planning.

“Judy is a ‘Rock of Gibraltar’ in our division who rolls up her sleeves and gets the job done no matter the obstacle,” D’Andrea wrote in an email to his staff. “While she will be missed in her formal planned giving role, she will continue to help advance this very important part of our Advancement fundraising model.”

Born and raised in DeKalb, Schneider earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before following her father, Bob Brown, into journalism. She worked from 1986 to 2000 at WCIA-TV in Champaign as a news reporter and community/public affairs producer and host.

“I grew up following my father, a 50-year broadcasting veteran at local radio WLBK, as he interviewed people around the county. I learned that I, too, enjoyed hearing people’s stories, which led me to a broadcasting career,” she says.

“My work today is much the same,” she adds. “I meet some of the most interesting people, learn about their passions and desires and connect them to those areas at NIU.”

Schneider is eager to pair names with faces in the college: “I welcome the opportunity to meet for a cup of coffee to hear your stories,” she says, “and how NIU has made a difference in your life.”



Iowa State honors David Walker

David Walker

David Walker

David Walker’s fervent curiosity about the world beyond the United States has shaped his life.

As an undergraduate at St. Olaf College in Minnesota, he earned a bachelor’s degree in history, political science and Russian studies. He also studied abroad in the former Soviet Union in 1987.

“I got a taste of being overseas,” Walker says, “and I enjoyed it immensely.”

Following graduation, Walker and his wife joined the Peace Corps, serving together from 1989 to 1991 in Zaire (now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo) and from 1992 to 1994 in Mauritania.

Those years in Francophone Africa sparked his interest in the history of that region, and upon his return home, he enrolled at Iowa State University to earn a master’s degree in history. He later completed a Ph.D. there in education.

Since then, as an academic with a dynamic research agenda of qualitative methodology, significant grant funding, a strong record of mentoring graduate students and a platform of promoting international collaboration as president of the Mid-Western Educational Research Association, Walker has undeniably forged an impressive career.

Now the associate dean of the NIU College of Education has external confirmation of that fact.

globeWalker is the 2017 recipient of Iowa State’s Virgil Lagomarcino Laureate Award, which honors graduates of the College of Human Sciences who are nationally and internationally recognized for their meritorious service or distinguished achievement in the field of education.

He will travel to Ames in October for the ceremony, which takes place during Homecoming.

“I feel very honored and humbled that my peers support me. Iowa State is kind of where it all started for me,” says Walker, who came to NIU in 2003 as an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment.

The former Cyclone has dedicated himself to modeling his professors there.

“At Iowa State, I mentored under some of the best in the business,” he says, “and after I graduated, it became apparent to me how privileged I was to study under these great names in our field. I consider it my due diligence to give back to the field, and I strive to do that in my teaching and research.”

Fellow Iowa State alumna Christine Sorensen Irvine, a former dean of the NIU College of Education, nominated Walker for the award. The two also have published together.

Walker is looking forward to his trip back to Ames to collect his Lagomarcino.

“I’ll see a lot of good friends and mentors,” he says. “It’s going to be a great evening.”



NIU connects Downers Grove with eighth-graders in Taiwan

The view from Taiwan: Students from National University of Tainan Affiliated Primary School returned late in the evening for the Skype session.

The view from Taiwan: Students from National University of Tainan Affiliated Primary School returned late in the evening to Skype.
Teacher Chen Jin-Ting is on the left.

It opened with simple hellos before the conversation turned to favorite foods and hobbies.

Peering into webcams, the strangers made small talk across oceans through the power of Skype. This was only Day One, though; the real conversation would come 48 hours later.

And when that began – at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 22, inside an eighth-grade science classroom at Downers Grove’s O’Neill Middle School – hour-long scientific argumentation between U.S. students and their Taiwanese counterparts proved lively and educational.

For the next hour, they argued this question: If funding were limited, which form of alternative energy would you select as the best to promote and advance?

“Everything went well. The students were really engaged, and we got lucky – we didn’t get into any technical issues,” said Pi-Sui Hsu, an associate professor in the NIU Department of Educational Technology, Research and Assessment.

“They really enjoyed the opportunity to talk to students from a different culture – that’s a really big thing for them – and they were glad to learn some Chinese,” she added. “They were so excited. They kept repeating phrases they learned from me.”

skype-1

The view from Illinois: Eighth-graders arrived early to link up with their Taiwanese counterparts.

Meg Van Dyke, an eighth-grade science teacher at O’Neill, is grateful for her classroom’s involvement in what she calls “a wonderful opportunity.”

“The research project allows students a unique opportunity to receive a global perspective on alternative energy. For example, the students in Taiwan don’t have as much exposure to nuclear energy as students in the United States,” Van Dyke said. “It also forces my students to think about how small Taiwan is and what alternative energy would work best for them.”

O’Neill’s international collaboration with Taiwan’s National University of Tainan Affiliated Primary School is part of Hsu’s research project on scientific argumentation, a process which enhances understanding of science, sharpens critical thinking skills and aligns with the “Science and Engineering Practices” dimension of the Next Generation Science Standards.

“Scientific argumentation is a process that scientists engage in by talking and presenting different perspectives to reach consensus,” she said. “We don’t teach science as a mere learning of facts. Our students need to engage in reasoning, just like professional scientists.”

Pi-Sui Hsu

Pi-Sui Hsu

Darby Sawyer, a senior in the College of Education with a contract major, joined Hsu in the early-morning trip to O’Neill.

Sawyer walked around the classroom, checking in on the groups and keeping them on track. Further help came from Lucidchart, a web-based diagramming tool with real-time collaboration that allowed the students to put (and point to) their ideas in flow charts.

“The students were definitely excited to talk to their counterparts in Taiwan,” Sawyer said. “I definitely learned a lot about the scientific argumentation process by watching them engage with the different culture and seeing them put their heads together.”

Hsu’s work is funded by the Taiwan Ministry of Education, which now has put three rounds of money behind the project. She returns to her native Taiwan each summer to provide training in scientific argumentation to teachers there, something that continues online during the fall, winter and spring.

“My goal is encourage collaboration, and I’m interested in cultural differences,” she said. “We train students in the concept of scientific argumentation, and we give them a global view of what goes on in different countries.”

Principal Hsu Chih-Ting and Research Division Wang Hsin-Chang

Principal Hsu Chih-Ting and Research Division Wang Hsin-Chang

The recent collaboration continues her work with Van Dyke, an NIU alum.

In the summer of 2014, Hsu and Van Dyke welcomed 26 young students from Taiwan to DeKalb for the College of Education’s three-week “Argue Like a Scientist” academic summer camp. The two also have published research together.

Students in Hsu’s NIU College of Education classes also are benefiting from the work. The college values and prioritizes research as part of its vision and mission.

“As a researcher, I like to see how technology supports students in their learning,” she said. “In my doctoral-level classes, I share with them about my research design and the successes and struggles. I share project ideas with them, and this gives them ideas about how to use technology to design international collaborations.”

Research Division Liu Hsin-Chi

Research Division Liu Hsin-Chi

Hsu and Sawyer plan to co-publish and/or co-present the results of the project; meanwhile, Van Dyke’s students are writing essays on what they learned.



Community Learning Series: Five ways to make sure kids grow through their love of tech

Parents can’t help but worry.

Phones, tablets and apps galore are competing for the undivided attention of their children and teens – and chances probably seem good to many moms and dads that the technology is winning.

So what can we do to make sure that our kids are getting the most out of their Internet-connected gadgets? Is there a way to promote their educational potential while mitigating the negative consequences?

Five experts convened March 23 by the NIU College of Education to explore “The Digital Lives of Children: Giving Screen Time a Closer Look” offered opinions and strategies that can help parents make sense of it all.

  • Remember that quality of content and user experience matter. All devices are potential tools for learning through their rapid feedback and just-in-time information. Developers of instructional technology consciously design software to deliver active learning that follows educational best practices. Ask yourself: Is this device or app helping my child to learn about the world – and to make sense of it? Is it making a stronger impact than a textbook? Searching the Internet for information can turn users into critical consumers who spend their learning time deliberating what this information means rather than digging for it.
  • Set rules. The American Academy of Pediatrics in October 2016 issued new recommendations for screen time, including zero hours a day for children from birth to age 2 and no more than one hour a day for preschoolers. For school-age children – kindergarten through high school – establish screen-free places, especially bedrooms, and screen-free times, such as family dinner and one hour before bedtime. Parents also must realize that their own digital lives influence those of their children; if they’re watching you, turn off the tablet or put down the phone.
  • Keep a close eye on your child’s digital life. Remind your kids that part of the agreement of supplying them with tech is that you are free to monitor their devices, scroll through their screens and ask questions. Make sure you understand the functions of their favorite apps. If they’re on Snapchat, you should join Snapchat. If you aren’t familiar with their apps, yet you choose not to intervene, consider that akin to allowing them to spend the night at the home a friend whose parents you’ve never met. Network with other parents to stay informed.
  • Encourage active programs. The hugely popular Minecraft – “Legos with no parameters,” said panelist Jennifer McCormick, a fourth-grade teacher at West Elementary School in Sycamore Community School District 427 – requires users to think creatively and to interact. Many videos on YouTube are instructional, harnessing the medium of “modeling” to teach viewers to cook, knit, braid hair or thousands of other things in a way that’s far more effective than words on a page. Even video games require players to remain actively engaged by plotting strategies and making and executing decisions. Many video games also spool out instructions as the games progress, something that forces constant attention – unlike presenting all the rules before the game starts and likely causing players to ignore them.
  • Pay close attention for “red flags” of digital addiction. Are their devices getting in the way of their normal activities? Are they choosing their phones over other alternatives for human interaction or physical activity? Are they ignoring you? Do they put up a fight when asked to turn off, or turn over, the tech? Are their grades suffering? Is their use of technology a way to self-medicate for depression?
Panelists, from left: Jennifer McCormick, John Burkey, Jason Underwood, Susan Goldman and Danielle Baran.

Panelists, from left: Jennifer McCormick, John Burkey, Jason Underwood,
Susan Goldman and Danielle Baran.

 

For parents who fear it’s already too late, panelist Danielle Baran, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Park Ridge, has advice: Ask yourself how you got to this place. For example, if your children need screens to calm down, did you instill that behavior?

Baran also agreed with fellow panelist Susan Goldman, Ph.D., distinguished professor of psychology and education at the University of Illinois at Chicago: Human interaction – human emotional connection – is key.

“No technology you can invent has more buttons than you,” Baran said. “You are limitless.”

Other members of the NIU College of Education’s Community Learning Series panel were John Burkey, superintendent of Huntley Community School District 158, and Jason Underwood, senior instructional designer at assistant director of the NIU eLearning and Digital Convergence Lab.



Lone Star stars: Educate U.S. ‘teas’ up for May trip to Texas

Jennifer Johnson, director of teacher preparation and development, talks about Educate U.S.

Jennifer Johnson, director of teacher preparation and development, talks about Educate U.S.

NIU College of Education students selected for the May 2017 edition of Educate U.S. gathered last week in a Graham Hall classroom to learn more about their pending trip to the Houston Independent School District.

Jennifer Johnson, the college’s director of teacher preparation and development, and Portia Downey, professional development coordinator, covered basics such as transportation times, liability forms, ground rules and more.

But the orientation session was mostly fun and festive.

The room was adorned with numerous Texas flags, many taped to the door and walls with others in the forms of paper plates and napkins at the buffet table, which dished up walking tacos, Downey’s homemade Texas Cowboy Cookies, Texas Sweet Tea and drinking glasses in the shape of cowboy boots.

Students also had their choice of Educate U.S. T-shirts and official College of Education red polo shirts.

David Walker, associate dean of the NIU College of Education, congratulated the group for pursuing the “phenomenal program” that sends outstanding pre-service teachers to Texas for donor-funded, all-expenses-paid experiences in a large, urban school district.

Elementary Education majors Marcus Lewis and Abby Spankroy listen during the Educate U.S. orientation.

Elementary Education majors Marcus Lewis and Abby Spankroy listen during the Educate U.S. orientation.

“You made it. You’re the best of the best. We’re really excited for you to be a part of this,” said Walker, who also promoted this summer’s Educate Global program in Taiwan. “When I was a student many years ago, I wish I would have had these opportunities.”

Educate U.S. participants work side-by-side with mentor teachers, observing in classrooms, preparing lessons, and engaging in co-teaching strategies. They also participate with students, host families and community members in a variety of extracurricular and community events, further enriching their experience.

Marcus Lewis, a junior elementary education major, applied for Educate U.S. to glimpse how school is taught outside the borders of Illinois.

“I’d like to experience a different area of the United States, and see how they take on education and pedagogy,” said Lewis, who also is participating in Educate Global this summer. “I value education as a tool for change, and I believe it’s one of the most important aspects of society.”

Lewis, who’s heard “nothing but great things” about Educate U.S., hopes to teach fourth-grade. “It’s a great transition time,” he said. “They’re moving into adolescence. They’re not babies anymore. They’re starting to rationalize.”

Sarah Younglove, a special education major, expects that her week in Houston will provide a view completely unlike her “predominantly white” hometown of Oregon, Ill.

Sarah Younglove (right) and Emma Foelske

Sarah Younglove (right) and Emma Foelske

“I’m from a really small town with less than 4,000 people,” she said. “This is a great opportunity to go to a school district that’s got more than 215,000 students, and to experience different cultures.”

Younglove is equally excited for her future career. “I just feel very passionate about seeing students reach their full potential,” she said, “and I think the world needs as many passionate teachers as it can get.”

Lorena Flores, a transfer student in Middle Level Teaching and Learning, is eager to explore Houston’s bilingual classrooms.

“I’ve never seen that applied at the middle level,” she said. “I want to see how they do it.”

Flores, a veteran of the U.S. Navy who developed a love of teaching as a drill instructor, also looks forward to observing and living “the everyday life of a teacher” who must balance school and home.

Her goal as a science teacher is to emulate one of her former instructors. “In high school, I had a certain math teacher who ended up being my math teacher for three years in a row,” she said. “I hated math – but he made it fun and interesting, and he treated us as people, not just a name or a number.”

texas-tacosEarly Childhood Studies majors traveling in May are Nycol Durham, Malika Lee, Ashley Kivikoski, Wendy Castillo-Guzman, Katelynn Horton, Ashley Hodges, Caroline Stephens and Catherina Rousonelos.

Elementary Education majors are Nicole VanGarsse, Abby Spankroy, Erin Kostos, Sarah Raila, Jennifer Lucchsi and Marcus Lewis.

Middle Level Teaching and Learning majors are Emma Foelske, Samantha Oakley and Lorena Flores. Special Education majors are Bailey Fisch, Rachel Streight and Sarah Younglove.

texas-group



Project Slide

Students in their second professional semester (diversity block) will have the opportunity to collaborate with 5th grade students and STEM teachers from Golfview Elementary School in CUSD 300, Carpentersville, Illinois, for two days. This collaboration will provide science literacy hands-on experiences in a diverse environment related to the school curriculum and NIU course assignments.

Golfview Elementary School located at 124 Golfview Lane, Carpentersville, IL, 60110, houses PK through grade 5 students. There are approximately 750 students: 95.5% Hispanic, 1.6% White, 1.3% African-American, and 94.1% of the students receive free or discounted lunch.  All Golfview fifth grade classrooms (120 students) and NIU students (30) enrolled in Dianne Zalesky‘s ESL Methods and Materials course and Gary Swick’s Community as a Resource course will work in small groups throughout the project.

Students would be involved in two visits set for April 7 and April 21. On their first visit, the NIU students will teach lessons related to biodiversity at the Golfview Elementary School site.  On the second visit, students will meet at Schweitzer Environmental Center. The projects will be finalized and left on display for parents and community members to view.

CUSD 300 and Friends of the Fox River entered into a lease agreement with Kane County to operate an environmental center located in Schweitzer Woods Forest Preserve.  Some features of the center are:

  • easily accessible by students to return with their families
  • has the capacity for hosting meetings, classes, and projects
  • features all 3 main habitat types for study on 160 acre property
  • has Kane County Forest Preserve District as a supporter and partner
  • has a variety of educational resources on-site
  • has a strong educational foundation through affiliation with Friends of the Fox
  • is supported through Project Learning Tree activities, curriculum, and professional development

The Golfview Elementary School principal, Lindsay Sharp, is enthusiastic about the possibilities this initial partnership with NIU students can provide.  In addition, this collaboration between NIU students and Golfview Elementary students supports the COE mission as an added value experience by providing teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, teach, and facilitate researched-based lessons, engage in student-centered learning activities, and collaborate in a diverse community.



Digital dilemma: CLS panel to examine children’s ‘screen time’

cellphone-girlDo you think your children spend too much time glued to digital devices? Are you worried that they’re more connected with their phones, tablets and TVs than with their families and friends?

You’re not alone.

Children ages 8 and younger engage with their screens an average of six hours each day, according to a recent study.

For some school-age children, that connection could improve academic achievement, especially language skills and literacy. Others, however, might experience losses in those areas along with higher rates of obesity and depression.

How can educators, parents, guardians and professionals promote the educational promises of screen time while also mitigating the negative consequences?

The NIU College of Education’s spring Community Learning Series will examine this question from all sides Thursday, March 23, with “The Digital Lives of Children: Giving Screen Time a Closer Look.”

Moderated by Dan Klefstad, host of Northern Public Radio’s popular news program Morning Edition, the panel discussion will take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in Barsema Alumni and Visitors Center, 231 N. Annie Glidden Road.

Top: Carolyn Pluim (Vander Schee) and Ben Creed. Bottom: Lindsay Harris and Amy Stich

Top: Carolyn Pluim (Vander Schee) and Ben Creed
Bottom: Lindsay Harris and Amy Stich

WNIJ-89.5 FM is the media sponsor of the event, which is free and open to the public. A networking reception is scheduled from 5 to 6 p.m.

Carolyn Pluim (Vander Schee), chair of the Department of Leadership, Educational Psychology and Foundations, organized the event with faculty members Benjamin Creed, Lindsay Harris and Amy Stich.

“Where does research stand on these questions? To what extent is research considered by technology developers and educational policymakers? How have parents and educators dealt with increased screen time in homes and schools?” Pluim said.

“Our panel will explore these questions through dialogue between the evidence-based opinions of experts in the fields of psychology and educational technology,” she added, “along with the experiences of professional educators and the experiences and perspectives of the audience.”

Panelists will address what current research says about the relationship between screen time and cognitive and emotional development; academic engagement and achievement; literacy, language and communication skills; and physical health.

They also will provide strategies for parents, Pluim said.

Members of the panel:

  • Danielle Baran, a clinical psychologist at Advocate Children’s Hospital
  • John Burkey, superintendent, Huntley Community School District 158
  • Susan Goldman, Distinguished Professor of psychology and education, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Thomas Kim, principal, Huntley Middle School, DeKalb Community Unit School District 428
  • Jennifer McCormick, fourth-grade teacher, West Elementary, Sycamore Community School District 427
  • Jason Underwood, assistant director, NIU Outreach eLearning

wnij-logoThe NIU College of Education’s Community Learning Series brings together experts from various disciplines and occupations to discuss topics that have included public school leadership, innovative classroom teaching, gender, civil rights, concussions, athletic training and more.



Time is short: March 23 deadline nears for award nominations

trophyFinal friendly reminder: If you know colleagues in the College of Education who deserve special recognition for their work over the past year, the deadline is 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 23, to nominate them for a 2017 College of Education Awards.

This year’s honors come in eight categories, each with specific criteria:

A letter from the nominator and two letters of support are required to complete the online nomination.